Theresa O'Young PharmD


Staying Safe When You Take Several Medicines

Older adults and people with long-term diseases often need to take a lot of pills. That can cause problems. If you take more than one medicine that works the same way, you could get too high a dose. Sometimes medicines work against each other . So it’s really important to ask every doctor you visit to look at your…

Reading medicine labels

1 Information about over-the-counter drugs can be found on labels attached to the product. Sometimes there is more information on or inside the product packaging. 2 An ACTIVE INGREDIENT is the part of the medicine that affects your body in a particular way. If the medicine is a sleeping aid, the active ingredient is…

Unlabeled Use

An unlabeled use of a drug is when a doctor prescribes a medicine for a purpose other than that for which it has been specifically designed and approved. Sometimes a drug is prescribed for a specific unlabeled use so often that doctors consider it a common practice. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration…

Over-the-Counter Medicines

Medicines you can buy without a prescription are called nonprescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medicines. They may be taken to treat minor health problems at home. Examples of over-the-counter medicines are acetaminophen, aspirin, antacids, decongestants, antihistamines, and laxatives. It’s important to talk to your…

Over-the-Counter Medicines

Medicines you can buy without a prescription are called nonprescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medicines. They may be taken to treat minor health problems at home. Examples of over-the-counter medicines are acetaminophen, aspirin, antacids, decongestants, antihistamines, and laxatives. It’s important to talk to your…