Local families fighting childhood cancer team up to raise awareness, money

Local families fighting childhood cancer team up to raise awareness, money

Coleman, Addie and Easton were all diagnosed with cancer in the last year and on Saturday, their parents hosted an event to raise money for pediatric cancer research and celebrate their brave little fighters.
Four-year-old Addie Abernathey finishes months of intensive treatment on Monday. “His is orbital rabdomyosarcoma, which is a very uncommon cancer we’re told,” Easton’s mom, Paige Brown, said, “and it was very interesting when we found out about Addie who was diagnosed just a few months after Easton.”
And then there’s Coleman, or Cole, Ross, who has also been fighting for his life as well, diagnosed with high-risk neuroblastoma in December of last year.
All three of these families fighting for their children’s lives together. “They’re really encouraging to me and I feel like we’ll be friends forever because we just have this special connection that not everyone understands. “These kids are incredible,” Allyson Ross added.
These families don’t feel like their battle is over or their children are in the clear once treatment is completed; they say they’ll worry about whether or not the cancer will recur.
But they are hopeful, and sending the message to other families to get connected with people going through similar situations because that’s what’s helped them get through it all.
Learn more about Addie’s journey on this Facebook page Hope for Addie.

Childhood cancer survivor returns to Atlanta hospital as nurse more than 20 years later

Childhood cancer survivor returns to Atlanta hospital as nurse more than 20 years later

ATLANTA – This week, Montana Brown started working as a staff nurse in Atlanta, Georgia.
Brown is not just any new nurse at the AFLAC Cancer Center though, she’s also a former patient there.
She underwent chemotherapy for a year at the AFLAC Cancer Center.
By the time, Brown reached high school, she had been active in competitive gymnastics and competitive cheerleading for years. “I had just tried out for my high school cheerleading team,” she said. “The nurses here, as great as they were when I was 2 — from what my mom says — they were extremely loving and caring and compassionate. And, just the love they showed me and my family in our time of need just really helped me,” she said. “It helped me want to become as kind and as caring and as compassionate as they were for me.” “[In nursing school,] I would always say, ‘I’m only going to nursing school to do pediatric oncology, like I don’t want to do anything else. “I’m not walking through the doors as a patient anymore.

Childhood cancer survivor returns to hospital as nurse more than 20 years later

Childhood cancer survivor returns to hospital as nurse more than 20 years later

This week, Montana Brown started working as a staff nurse in Atlanta, Georgia.
Brown is not just any new nurse at the AFLAC Cancer Center though, she’s also a former patient there.
She underwent chemotherapy for a year at the AFLAC Cancer Center.
By the time, Brown reached high school, she had been active in competitive gymnastics and competitive cheerleading for years. “I had just tried out for my high school cheerleading team,” she said. “The nurses here, as great as they were when I was 2 — from what my mom says — they were extremely loving and caring and compassionate. And, just the love they showed me and my family in our time of need just really helped me,” she said. “It helped me want to become as kind and as caring and as compassionate as they were for me.” “[In nursing school,] I would always say, ‘I’m only going to nursing school to do pediatric oncology, like I don’t want to do anything else.

Portraits of People Who Lost a Loved One to Childhood Cancer

Portraits of People Who Lost a Loved One to Childhood Cancer

Titled #NoMoreOptions, it’s a series of portraits of people who lost a loved one to childhood cancer.
“As photographers, it’s often our job to take on controversial issues and present them to the public using imagery that makes a real impact,” Johnson says.
He noticed that virtually every campaign focuses on the children dealing with the disease.
“Photos of children who are suffering are extremely hard to take; so much so that people don’t like to look at them,” Johnson says.
Johnson asked parents and siblings to write and read letters to the children who had been taken from them.
“We can make a difference.