This Purple Veggie May Help Ward Off Colon Cancer

This Purple Veggie May Help Ward Off Colon Cancer

. A new study has linked purple potatoes to a lower risk of colon cancer in pigs.
These vibrant tubers might also help ward off colon cancer, according to new research done on animals at Pennsylvania State University.
To find out how the veggie might affect colon cancer risk, the researchers fed three groups of pigs one of three diets for 13 weeks: a high-calorie diet, a high-calorie diet supplemented with raw or baked purple potatoes, and a standard control diet.
And if you needed any more motivation to add purple potatoes to your plate, keep in mind that their phenolic acids and anthocyanins may help protect against other illnesses, including heart disease, as well.
Oven roast whole purple potatoes and drizzle with tahini for a healthy side dish.
Chill oven-roasted purple potatoes, slice, and add to entree salads.
Use purple potatoes in stews, soups, and chili.
For a complete meal, bake purple potatoes, slice lengthwise, and fill with a combo of veggies and herbs sautéed with a lean protein, like lentils or ground turkey.

DR ELLIE CANNON: How to cut your risk of bowel cancer and what you need to eat to beat it

DR ELLIE CANNON: How to cut your risk of bowel cancer and what you need to eat to beat it

That’s why it is important to get anything you feel is not quite right for you checked out.
The World Health Organisation has warned that 50g of processed meat a day – just one sausage – increases the chance of developing bowel cancer by 18 per cent.
According to Cancer Research UK, the less alcohol you drink, the lower your risk of cancer.
The solution: It is important to say that not everyone who drinks alcohol will get cancer – of course not – but it is a risk and we have to weigh up that risk.
Exercise is also linked to a lower risk of polyps developing in the bowel.
He says: ‘I used to love bacon – and as a 6ft-tall former rugby player, I’d eat meat most days.
‘Research into genes for bowel cancer is at an early stage, so they don’t know how significant these anomalies are, but she’s now been told to have a colonoscopy every year, rather than every five years as she did before.

Aspirin slashes risk of gastrointestinal cancer

Aspirin slashes risk of gastrointestinal cancer

Of these, colorectal cancer is thought to be the most widespread in the Western world; in the United States, this form of malignancy is the second leading cause of cancer-related death.
In addition to these, an increasing number of studies have been recently pointing to another prevention strategy: the use of aspirin.
In 2009, an international consensus statement said, “Evidence clearly shows a chemopreventive effect for aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs […] on colorectal cancer and probably other cancer types.”
Studying digestive cancer and aspirin use Prof. Tsoi and his colleagues examined 618,884 participants, 206,295 of whom were aspirin users.
Patients taking aspirin were aged 67.5 years, on average, and those who weren’t were aged 67.6 years, on average.
The team followed the patients’ outcomes for up to 14 years, looking for incidences of gastrointestinal cancers, which included colorectal cancer, liver cancer, esophageal cancer, pancreatic cancer, and gastric cancer, as well as non-gastrointestinal ones, which included “breast, bladder, kidney, leukemia, lung, multiple myeloma, or prostate cancers.”
Overall, during the follow-up period, 15.9 percent of the patients developed cancer, with lung cancer being the most prevalent.
Digestive cancer risk cut by up to 47 percent “Long-term use of aspirin showed 24 percent to 47 percent significant reduction on major cancers in the [gastrointestinal] tract,” write the authors.
More specifically, aspirin users were 47 percent less likely to have liver and esophageal cancer, 38 percent less likely to have stomach cancer, and 34 percent less likely to have pancreatic cancer.
The findings demonstrate that the long-term use of aspirin can reduce the risk of developing many major cancers […] What should be noted is the significance of the results for cancers within the digestive tract, where the reductions in cancer incidence were all very substantial, especially for liver and esophageal cancer.”

The role of EZH2 in overall survival of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis

The role of EZH2 in overall survival of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis

The role of the gene EZH2 in colorectal cancer survival is uncertainly, the aim of this study is clear this relationship. A meta-analysis was performed with elegible studies which quantitatively evaluated the relationship between EZH2 overexpression and survival of patients with colorectal cancer. Combined hazard ratios suggested that EZH2 overexpression was associated with better prognosis of overall survival (OS) HR(hazard ratio) = 0.61 95% CI (0.38–0.84) We performed bias analysis according Egger and Begg,s test and we did not find publication bias. EZH2 overexpression indicates a better prognosis for colorectal cancer.
One of the mechanisms that regulate histone epigenetic modification is mediated by the polycomb repressive complexes (PcG).
The present work undertakes a systematic review of studies that include the analysis of the expression of EZH2, and attempts to evaluate its influence over prognosis in CRC, through an analysis of the overall survival rates. Additionally, the methodological quality of the selected studies was assessed.
The initial search was undertaken with no limitations as to language, but full paper reading and later assessment were only completed in works published in English.
An analysis of publication bias was carried out with the methods proposed by Egger et al.33 and Begg & Mazumdar34.

Colon cancer screening test suspended due to manufacturing defect

Colon cancer screening test suspended due to manufacturing defect

Cancer Agency is suspending stool sample collection testing, which could mean the delayed diagnosis of a number of colorectal cancers in B.C.
Cancer Agency is suspending stool sample collection testing, which could mean diagnostic delays in a number of colorectal cancers in B.C.
Testing has been suspended because of a manufacturing problem affecting the accuracy of fecal immunochemical tests (FIT) that detect blood in the stool.
But we need a test that is reliable and when you are getting too many false positives, it shows that we need to solve this problem as quickly as possible,” Spinelli said.
The setback is yet another in a long series of problems associated with the colon cancer screening program. Resource issues (shortages of allocated hospital time and space for colonoscopies) have plagued the screening program from the outset, forcing patients to wait too long for colonoscopies after abnormal screening tests.
Patients with abnormal results are then referred to a gastrointestinal specialist for a follow-up colonoscopy.
“If you are at high risk of colon cancer due to a strong family history or personal history of (abnormal growths), your doctor can still refer you to the Colon Screening Program for colonoscopy.
Patients who have recently submitted tests to a laboratory, but have not yet received results, will need to be retested, but only after testing resumes.