Does menopause cause dizziness?

Does menopause cause dizziness?

Women are more likely to experience dizziness during menopause, possibly due to the aging process and changes in hormone levels.
What causes dizziness during menopause?
Here are some possible explanations: Hormonal changes Menopause symptoms appear during perimenopause, the transition to menopause.
These hormones also play a role in the activity of other organs, including the brain, the heart, and the pancreas.
When the body’s estrogen levels drop, cells throughout the body may not receive enough glucose.
Aging The aging process can cause the inner ear and other body systems to stop working as well as they used to.
Indirect causes Dizziness is sometimes a symptom of a menopause-related condition, rather than a direct symptom of menopause.
Regular exercise, healthful eating, and hydration can also improve sleep.
Talk therapy and avoiding triggers of stress may also help.
Hormone therapy Hormone replacement therapy can help relieve perimenopause symptoms, including dizziness.

Menopause bloating: Causes and relief

Menopause bloating: Causes and relief

In some cases, bloating can cause a person’s stomach to swell.
Both can cause bloating during menopause.
A woman’s hormone levels frequently fluctuate during perimenopause, which is the time leading up to menopause when a woman’s periods are decreasing. Increased estrogen levels can cause water retention, which can in turn cause bloating.
While water retention leads to bloating, hydration keeps the gastrointestinal tract moving smoothly.
Smoking can cause a person to swallow air, leading to bloating.
Eating too much salt can cause water retention and swelling. To reduce salt content, a person should avoid processed foods.
If a woman finds she suffers from frequent bloating during menopause, there are several medical treatments to relieve the discomfort.

Menopause may trigger Alzheimer’s disease

Menopause may trigger Alzheimer’s disease

A new study highlights the metabolic changes that occur in the brains of menopausal and perimenopausal women, suggesting that a loss of estrogen could make these women vulnerable to developing Alzheimer’s disease.
Dr. Lisa Mosconi, from Weill Cornell Medicine, is the lead author of the study, and the findings were published in the journal PLoS One.
As Dr. Mosconi and her colleagues explain, after old age, being female is the second most major risk factor for developing Alzheimer’s disease.
Although the mechanisms responsible for this increased risk are not yet known, previous research has hinted at the transition to menopause as a potential key.
As the authors explain, this transition also involves neurological and metabolical changes. So, Dr. Mosconi and team decided to investigate these transformations.
The study found that the perimenopausal and postmenopausal women had significantly lower glucose metabolism levels than those who were premenopausal.
Brain cells have estrogen receptors, they explain, and a drop in estrogen levels may cause a “starvation reaction” in these cells. Such a metabolic state can lead to brain cell dysfunction.
It also means the loss of a key neuroprotective element in the female brain and a higher vulnerability to brain aging and Alzheimer’s disease.”

Being underweight may trigger early menopause

Being underweight may trigger early menopause

A large study of almost 80,000 women concludes that being underweight poses a risk of experiencing early menopause.
The researchers were led by Dr. Kathleen Szegda — who, at the time of the study, was a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst — and the findings were published in the journal Human Reproduction.
They therefore hypothesized that how much a woman weighs may also affect when she experiences menopause.
This information, along with data on hormone therapy use, was gathered and updated every 2 years.
The team used multiple regression models to assess early menopause risk, and overall, 2,804 women in the study reported having experienced it.
In the study, women with a body mass index (BMI) below 18.5 kilograms per square meter — at any age — were 30 percent more likely to experience early menopause compared with women whose BMI was between 18.5 and 22.4 kilograms per square meter.
The researchers also found that women whose BMI was between 25 and 29.9 kilgrams per sqaure meter were up to 30 percent less likely to experience early menopause.
The highest likelihood of having early menopause seemed to be among women who, when they were 18 years old, had a BMI below 18.5 kilgrams per sqaure meter and reported having experienced “severe weight cycling.”
Clinical implications of the findings Dr. Szegda sums up the findings, saying, “[W]omen who are underweight in early or mid-adulthood may be at increased risk for early menopause.”
Dr. Szegda adds that 10 percent of women experience early menopause, and that “[u]nderweight women may want to consider discussing the potential implications of these findings with their doctors.”