New genetic risk factors for peanut and food allergy identified

New genetic risk factors for peanut and food allergy identified

Researchers have found new genetic factors linked to peanut allergy and food allergy.
The new study is the first to link a known gene called c11orf30/EMSY (EMSY) to food allergy.
Dr. Aida Eslami EMSY has already been linked to eczema, asthma, and other allergy-related conditions, and the new discovery supports the idea that it has a wider key role in predisposing people to allergy generally.
More evidence of genetic basis In their study paper, the researchers discuss how food allergy is the result of both genes and environment.
For example, the authors note that in the case of peanut allergy, the role of environment is supported by studies that show that “early oral exposure to peanut leads to development of tolerance.”
For the new study, the Canadian researchers scanned more than 7.5 million genetic locations in the DNA of 850 people with peanut allergy and nearly 1,000 people without it to search for markers that might be linked to food allergy.
Evidence of ‘epigenetic regulation’ The results showed that EMSY was linked to a raised risk of peanut allergy as well as food allergy.
The team also found evidence that five other genetic locations might be involved.
However, that study only offered a genetic explanation for around 20 percent of cases.
The new findings now offer many more genetic clues about the causes of peanut and food allergy, note the authors.

Feeding your baby this peanut powder may help prevent a peanut allergy

Feeding your baby this peanut powder may help prevent a peanut allergy

Want to hear something crazy? The prevalence of peanut allergies among U.S. kids doubled from 1997 to 2008—and today, around 2 percent of children are allergic to peanuts.
One reason for the surge: The longstanding advice—to withhold peanuts from children at high risk for allergies until they were 3 years old—was majorly flawed.
And this month, even more exciting peanut allergy news was announced: Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb announced that the FDA would allow companies that sell baby food (or foods suitable for infants) containing ground peanuts to make the qualified health claim that their foods may help prevent peanut allergies.
(Of course, you should still always consult with your doctor before feeding your child peanut butter or peanut-containing products for the fist time.)
According to a New York Times article, parents would buy a Hello, Peanut introduction kit containing seven pre-portioned packets of the powder, which incrementally increase in quantity from 200 mg (about 1 peanut’s worth) of peanut powder to 2 g (3 to 7 peanuts) of peanut powder.
Depending on your child’s risk for allergies, they may need to undergo skin or blood testing before using the product.
One thing to make crystal clear, however: This product does not cure or treat existing allergies. In fact, feeding Hello, Peanut or any peanut-containing food to a child with an existing peanut allergy could be very dangerous.

Cracking the Peanut Allergy – USDA Program Provides Doctors a Way to Help Children

Cracking the Peanut Allergy – USDA Program Provides Doctors a Way to Help Children

Recent studies have found that peanut allergies can be prevented in a high percentage of cases by introducing children to peanut-containing foods while they are still infants.
The revelation was made possible, in part, thanks to the resources provided by the National Peanut Board (NPB), an industry-funded board, established through a research, promotion and information program at the request of peanut producers.
The board helped to fund a study called Learning Early About Peanut Allergy (LEAP) that was conducted by researchers at the United Kingdom’s Kings College London.
In the study, up to 86 percent of the infants with a high risk (those with severe eczema, egg allergy, or both) for developing a peanut allergy who ate peanut foods between the ages of 4 and 11 months developed a protective factor that reduced their risk of having the allergy.
During LEAP-On, the children from the LEAP study who were exposed to peanut foods at an early age were not given peanut foods for 12 months.
In 2008, NPB provided funding to help initiate the early research published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology that led to the groundbreaking LEAP study and NPB continues to support this work. This research has contributed to the American Academy of Pediatrics recommending early introduction of peanut protein for infants who are at increased risk of developing the allergy. In January, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases released guidelines for practitioners and caregivers that details when and how to introduce peanut foods safely to prevent peanut allergies.

Peanut allergy risk SLASHED if parents do THIS simple trick during infancy

Peanut allergy risk SLASHED if parents do THIS simple trick during infancy

Food allergies are when the body’s immune system reacts unusually when eating particular items, and having an aversion to peanuts is one of the most common types.
Sufferers risk a runny nose, skin reactions, itching, digestive problems, tightening of the throat, and shortness of breath, if they consume the food.
However, researchers have discovered that peanut allergies could be prevented if mothers consumed them during breastfeeding.
We found that the introduction of peanuts before 12 months of age was associated with a reduced risk of peanut sensitisation by school age.
The Canadian study found that exposing children to them early in life could stop them suffering.
“We found that the introduction of peanuts before 12 months of age was associated with a reduced risk of peanut sensitisation by school age, particularly among children whose mothers consumed peanuts while breastfeeding,” said Dr Tracey Pitt, lead study author from the Humber River Hospital in Ontario.
The idea is that this will desensitise their immune system.
Allergy rates are on the rise in the UK, with one in every hundred people thought to suffer from a peanut allergy.
This is because they grow underground, as opposed to on trees like almonds.

FDA approves first commercial product for peanut allergy prevention

FDA approves first commercial product for peanut allergy prevention

. Now the US Food and Drug Administration has approved the first commercial product, called Hello, Peanut!, to help inform the public that early peanut introduction and regular consumption can reduce the risk of peanut allergy in young children.
After which maintenance packets are recommended for use up to three times a week.
It showed that high-risk children who regularly consumed peanut in infancy had far fewer peanut allergies by age 5 than their counterparts who avoided peanut over the same span of time.
Infants who have severe eczema or egg allergy are considered at high-risk of developing a peanut allergy. By offering peanut early in life – between 4-6 months of age – and continuing with regular consumption, we can prevent the onset of peanut allergy in many of these children. High-risk children should see their doctor before parents introduce peanut protein in any form. If the test is negative, age-appropriate peanut products can be given at home.
So do parents need a product like Hello, Peanut for children? Parents can introduce peanut protein using creamy peanut butter.