Persistent elevation of postoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio: A better predictor of survival in gastric cancer than elevated preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio

Persistent elevation of postoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio: A better predictor of survival in gastric cancer than elevated preoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio

Postoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio change (NLRc) reflects the dynamic change of balance between host inflammatory response and immune response after treatment.
The analysis revealed a higher predictive power for correlating patient survival with the NLRc compared with iNLR.
The NLRc could be a better indicator than iNLR for predicting survival in patients with gastric cancer.
Scatter plot of lymphocytes and neutrophils.
Full size image Disease-free and overall survival analysis according the initial neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (iNLR) (a,b) and postoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio change (NLRc) (c,d).
Full size image Postoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio change (NLRc) reflects the dynamic change of balance between host inflammatory response and immune response after treatment.
The analysis revealed a higher predictive power for correlating patient survival with the NLRc compared with iNLR.
The NLRc could be a better indicator than iNLR for predicting survival in patients with gastric cancer.
Scatter plot of lymphocytes and neutrophils.
Full size image Disease-free and overall survival analysis according the initial neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (iNLR) (a,b) and postoperative neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio change (NLRc) (c,d).

Common acid reflux drug increases stomach cancer risk

Common acid reflux drug increases stomach cancer risk

However, H. pylori have also been shown to cause the majority of stomach ulcers and are a known risk factor for stomach, or gastric, cancer.
The team focused on PPIs because a recent review and meta-analysis found an association between the long-term use of PPIs and an increased risk of stomach cancer.
In the new investigation, the scientists set out to “determine the risk of gastric cancer development among individuals who had received treatment for H. pylori with focus on the role of long-term PPIs.”
Overall, 153 people developed stomach cancer following triple therapy.
The results showed that people who took PPIs had more than twice (2.44) the risk of developing stomach cancer, whereas H2 blockers were not associated with an increased risk.
The increase in risk associated with PPIs matched the frequency of use: people who took the drugs daily had more than four times (4.55) the risk compared with those who took them weekly.
According to the researchers, this is “the first study to demonstrate that long-term PPI use, even after H. pylori eradication therapy, is still associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer.” “This finding provides strong evidence to suggest that the long-term use of PPIs still increase the risk of gastric cancer after H. pylori eradication.”
pylori.”
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Quantitative proteomic Analysis Reveals up-regulation of caveolin-1 in FOXP3-overexpressed human gastric cancer cells

Quantitative proteomic Analysis Reveals up-regulation of caveolin-1 in FOXP3-overexpressed human gastric cancer cells

We have recently reported that FOXP3 inhibited proliferation of gastric cancer (GC) cells through activating the apoptotic signaling pathway.
Then, the label-free quantitative proteomic approach was employed to further investigating the down-stream proteins regulated by FOXP3, resulting in a total of 3,978 proteins quantified, including 186 significantly changed proteins.
Then label-free proteomic experiments were performed to analyze the FOXP3-overexpressed AGS cells and vector cells, resulting in a total of 3978 proteins identified, of which 186 proteins were significantly changed (fold change >1.5, students’ t test p value <0.01) between these two types of cells. FOXP3 was over-expressed in GC cells with lentivirus transfection (AF cells), and the empty vector was also transfected into GC as control cells (ANC cells). The migration of GC cells was also significantly inhibited in FOXP3-overexpressing groups in the transwell migration assay (Fig. The number of migrated cells was lower for AF when compared with ANC, suggesting that FOXP3 inhibited GC cell migration. AF: FOXP3-overexpressing AGS cells; ANC: vector controls. Full size image Box plot analysis was applied to comparing the Log2 transformed LFQ intensity of the AF and ANC cell samples. Collectively, 186 proteins were significantly changed between AF and ANC cells; among them, 67 proteins were down-regulated and 119 proteins were up-regulated in the AF cells (Fig. According to our results, CAV1 were up-regulated in FOXP3-overexpressing cells comparing to control cells, and these results were consistent with the tumor suppresser role of CAV1 in primary tumors as reported.

Aspirin slashes risk of gastrointestinal cancer

Aspirin slashes risk of gastrointestinal cancer

Of these, colorectal cancer is thought to be the most widespread in the Western world; in the United States, this form of malignancy is the second leading cause of cancer-related death.
In addition to these, an increasing number of studies have been recently pointing to another prevention strategy: the use of aspirin.
In 2009, an international consensus statement said, “Evidence clearly shows a chemopreventive effect for aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs […] on colorectal cancer and probably other cancer types.”
Studying digestive cancer and aspirin use Prof. Tsoi and his colleagues examined 618,884 participants, 206,295 of whom were aspirin users.
Patients taking aspirin were aged 67.5 years, on average, and those who weren’t were aged 67.6 years, on average.
The team followed the patients’ outcomes for up to 14 years, looking for incidences of gastrointestinal cancers, which included colorectal cancer, liver cancer, esophageal cancer, pancreatic cancer, and gastric cancer, as well as non-gastrointestinal ones, which included “breast, bladder, kidney, leukemia, lung, multiple myeloma, or prostate cancers.”
Overall, during the follow-up period, 15.9 percent of the patients developed cancer, with lung cancer being the most prevalent.
Digestive cancer risk cut by up to 47 percent “Long-term use of aspirin showed 24 percent to 47 percent significant reduction on major cancers in the [gastrointestinal] tract,” write the authors.
More specifically, aspirin users were 47 percent less likely to have liver and esophageal cancer, 38 percent less likely to have stomach cancer, and 34 percent less likely to have pancreatic cancer.
The findings demonstrate that the long-term use of aspirin can reduce the risk of developing many major cancers […] What should be noted is the significance of the results for cancers within the digestive tract, where the reductions in cancer incidence were all very substantial, especially for liver and esophageal cancer.”

Effects of long-term aspirin use on molecular alterations in precancerous gastric mucosa in patients with and without gastric cancer

Effects of long-term aspirin use on molecular alterations in precancerous gastric mucosa in patients with and without gastric cancer

H. pylori infection rate was not significantly different among the three groups; 24 individuals (75.0%) in the control group, 21 patients (87.5%) in the AG group, and 11 patients (61.1%) in the GC group were negative for H. pylori.
(2) Molecular changes in IM by aspirin use The frequency of CIMP in IM significantly decreased in the AG group compared to the control group after aspirin use (p = 0.02) (Table 4).
(B) In IM, DNA hypermethylation of most genes other than CDH1 in the AG group and CDKN2A and MLH1 in the GC group was seen in the various portions of the stomach.
We found that long-term aspirin use was associated with a significant reduction of CDH1 methylation in AM and CIMP in IM, and that CDH1 methylation in AM was a significant biomarker for gastric dysplasia in patients taking aspirin.
Moreover, the authors performed analysis of methylation status using methylation-specific PCR, which is prone to false-positive results and is qualitative.
In this study, the number of genes that changed from methylated to unmethylated after aspirin use was higher in AM than in IM, indicating that aspirin was less effective in reversing the methylation that occurred in IM compared to AM.
We previously reported highly significant reactivity of mAb Das-1 against IM in GC patients compared to IM from non-cancer patients32,33,34,35.
One sample obtained from the angulus in the GC group could not be analyzed for molecular alterations due to the small amount of DNA extracted from the biopsy specimen.
In this cross-sectional study, we investigated molecular events including MSI, methylation of CpG islands of various genes, CIMP, and mAb Das-1 reactivity.
In this study, only samples with >10% methylation were considered methylated.