Sinusitis: Should I Have Surgery?

Guides through decision to have surgery to treat chronic sinusitis. Discusses endoscopic and traditional surgery. Explains who is a good candidate for surgery. Lists reasons for and against surgery. Includes interactive tool to help you make your decision.

Top of the pageDecision Point

Sinusitis: Should I Have Surgery?

You may want to have a say in this decision, or you may simply want to follow your doctor's recommendation. Either way, this information will help you understand what your choices are so that you can talk to your doctor about them.

Sinusitis: Should I Have Surgery?

Get the facts

Your options

  • Have surgery to treat long-term (chronic)
    sinusitis.
  • Don't have surgery. Take
    medicines and use home treatment.

Key points to remember

  • Very few people need surgery for sinusitis. Most people can
    treat the problem with home care and medicines.
  • Surgery may be a good choice for people who have long-term
    (chronic) sinusitis. They may get one infection after another because something
    blocks the flow of mucus from the sinuses or because of another health problem.
    Surgery can remove blockages and make the sinus openings bigger. This helps the
    sinuses drain, preventing more infections.
  • To be sure that surgery is a good choice, you need to have a
    CT scan of your sinuses. This test will be done after
    you have followed what's called "maximum medical treatment" for 4 to 6 weeks.
    This means that you take medicines and follow home treatment to reduce
    infection and swelling. That helps your doctor see what's causing your
    infections.
  • You may need more than one surgery to fix your sinuses.
  • After surgery, you still may need to take medicines, such as
    antibiotics, and follow home treatment for a long time.
  • If you
    get chronic sinusitis because of
    allergies or another problem, you need to get that
    problem under control before you have surgery. You will have better results
    from surgery if you use medicine and home treatment after surgery to help to
    keep that problem under control.
FAQs

What is sinusitis?

Sinusitis is infection or
inflammation of the
mucous membranes that line the
sinuses.

When a mucous membrane gets
inflamed, it swells. This can block the normal flow of fluid from the sinuses
into the nose and throat. Bacteria and fungi (plural of fungus) are more likely
to grow and cause an infection in sinuses that can't drain.

The
main cause of sinusitis is a viral infection, usually a cold. Allergies or
other problems also can block the nasal passages and lead to sinusitis.

There are two types of sinusitis: acute (short-term) and chronic
(long-term). You may have chronic sinusitis if:

  • You have had more than three sinus infections
    in 1 year that needed antibiotics to clear up, OR
  • You have had a sinus infection for more than 12
    weeks that
    antibiotics have not cleared up.

Surgery may be a good choice for some people who have
chronic sinusitis.

What can surgery do for sinusitis?

Surgery helps
the sinuses drain, preventing infections. The doctor usually makes the sinus
openings bigger by removing:

  • Infected, swollen, or damaged
    tissue.
  • Bone, to make a wider opening to let mucus drain from the
    sinuses.
  • Growths (polyps) inside the nose or sinuses.

There are two types of sinus surgery:

  • Endoscopic surgery is the type
    that is done most often. The doctor puts a thin, lighted tool called an
    endoscope in the nose to remove small amounts of bone or tissue that block the
    sinus openings. The doctor also can remove polyps.

  • Traditional surgery may be done
    for certain serious problems—such as pus in a sinus, infection of the facial
    bones, or a brain
    abscess. The doctor makes an opening into the sinus
    from inside the mouth or through the skin of the face.

Sometimes another problem inside the nose (such as a
deviated septum) also needs to be fixed. This may be done during the same
surgery.

After surgery, the doctor may recommend:

  • Antibiotics to help
    fight infection.
  • Steroid nasal spray to reduce inflammation and help you heal.

  • Pain medicine.

When is surgery needed for sinusitis?

Very few
people need surgery to treat sinusitis. But you may need surgery if
ALL of these are true:

  • Your doctor says that you have chronic
    sinusitis.
  • You've followed what's called "maximum medical
    treatment" for 4 to 6 weeks. This means that you've taken medicines and
    followed home treatment for at least 4 to 6 weeks. This treatment includes
    antibiotics, a
    steroid nasal spray, and other prescription
    medicines.
  • You've had a
    CT scan of your sinuses after the 4 to 6 weeks of
    treatment. It is very important to have the CT scan done after this treatment. Reducing the swelling and infection as
    much as possible lets your doctor see what could be causing your
    infections.
  • The CT scan shows that something, such as nasal polyps, is keeping your
    sinuses from draining as they should.

You also may need surgery if:

  • You have a sinus infection caused by a
    fungus. Infections caused by fungi cannot be cleared up with
    antibiotics.
  • You have a serious problem such as an infection that
    spreads beyond your sinuses. This is rare.

What are the benefits of sinus surgery?

Sinus
surgery can:

  • Help your sinuses drain, which can prevent
    sinus infections.
  • Improve your sense of smell. (But in some cases,
    scarring from surgery could decrease your sense of smell.)

Endoscopic surgery improves symptoms
for about 90 out of 100 people. About 10 out of 100 people find that it doesn't
help them.footnote 1

Surgery has the best chance
of working if you use a steroid nasal spray and do home treatment after surgery
to prevent future infections. You may need to use these treatments for a long
time.

What are the risks of sinus surgery?

Sinus surgery
can lead to minor or serious problems.

  • A small number of people have
    minor problems, such as:

    • Scar
      tissue.
    • Bleeding.
    • Infection.
    • A hole in the
      tissue between the nostrils (nasal septum).
    • Bruising and swelling
      around the eyes.
  • Serious but rare
    problems can include:

    • Heavy bleeding.
    • Injury to the
      eye area.
    • Inflammation of the tissue that covers the brain (meningitis).
    • Leakage of the fluid around
      the brain.
    • Brain injury.
  • Scarring from surgery could decrease your sense
    of smell.
  • The surgery might not work, so you could need a second surgery.

What can you do for sinusitis other than surgery?

Most of the time, you can treat your sinus problem with home care and
medicines.

Home treatment

  • Drink plenty of fluids
    to help keep the
    mucus thin.
  • Hold a warm, damp towel or a warm gel pack to your face for 5 to 10 minutes several
    times a day.
  • Breathe warm, moist air from a
    steamy shower, a hot bath, or a sink filled with hot water. Avoid very cool,
    dry air. A humidifier can add moisture to the air in your
    home.
  • Use saltwater nasal drops or washes to help
    keep your nasal passages open and to wash out mucus and bacteria. You can buy
    saline nose drops or saline nasal washes (such as a Neti Pot) at a drugstore or grocery store, or you can make your
    own at home. People around age 8 and older may also find it helpful to gargle often with warm salt water.
  • If you need to blow your nose, do it gently. Blowing your nose too hard may
    force thick mucus back into your sinuses. Keep both nostrils open when you blow
    your nose.

Medicines

  • Take pain relievers, such as
    acetaminophen or ibuprofen, that you can buy without a prescription.
  • Use a steroid nasal spray or decongestant nasal sprays or pills to reduce the swelling of the mucous membranes. If you use a nasal spray, do not use it longer than what the label says.
  • Take antibiotics as directed, if your doctor prescribes them.
    Antibiotics can treat most short-term (acute) sinusitis when it is caused by
    bacteria.

  • Use mucolytics (such as guaifenesin) to thin the mucus in your sinuses.

Be safe with medicines. Read and follow all instructions on the label. Some medicines may not be safe for young children or for people who have certain health problems.

Why might your doctor recommend surgery for sinusitis?

Your doctor might advise you to have surgery if:

  • You have many sinus infections that need
    treatment with antibiotics.
  • Home treatment doesn't stop your pain
    and other symptoms.
  • You've taken medicines and done home treatment
    for 4 to 6 weeks, and tests show that you have a sinus problem that surgery can
    fix.

Compare your options

Compare

What is usually involved?

What are the benefits?

What are the risks and side effects?

Have surgery for
sinusitis

Have surgery for
sinusitis

  • You may be asleep. Or the doctor may
    numb the area (like at the dentist) and give you medicine to make you
    sleepy.
  • You may have some packing in your nose after surgery. Some types
    dissolve on their own. Gauze packing will need to be removed a few days after
    surgery.
  • You still need to take antibiotics and use steroid sprays after
    surgery to prevent infection.
  • You may have to sleep with your head
    raised for a few days.
  • You can't bend forward for a few days after surgery.
  • It may clear up your sinus pain and
    pressure.
  • Endoscopic surgery improves symptoms in about 90 out
    of 100 people.footnote 1
  • You may get rid of bad
    breath caused by sinus infections.
  • You may have some pain and
    bleeding for 2 weeks after surgery.
  • You could have less sense of smell after
    surgery.
  • Serious but rare risks can include heavy bleeding,
    meningitis, and brain injury. But these happen in less
    than 1 out of 100 sinus surgeries. That means they don't happen more than 99 times
    out of 100.footnote 2
  • Surgery might not work. About
    10 out of 100 people find that it doesn't help.footnote 1
  • You could need to have another surgery.
Use home care for
sinusitis

Use home care for
sinusitis

  • You take
    antibiotics for a bacterial infection.
  • You use
    steroid nasal sprays,
    decongestants, and
    over-the-counter pain medicines.
  • You do
    other self-care, such as washing your nasal passages with saline, putting a
    warm cloth on your face, and blowing your nose gently.
  • Home care may get rid of your sinus
    infections.
  • Antibiotics are effective for bacterial infections.
  • You don't have the risks of surgery.
  • You don't have
    the pain of surgery or need to deal with follow-up care.
  • You can decide later to have surgery if home care doesn't help
    you enough.
  • Home care might not get
    rid of your sinus problem.
  • Antibiotics don't work for viral infections and don't work for all types of bacterial infections.
  • It won't fix certain serious problems, such as an infection in
    the bones of your face or a brain
    abscess.
  • Antibiotics can cause side
    effects, which may include
    allergic reaction, nausea, and
    diarrhea.
  • Steroid nasal sprays can cause side effects, which may
    include a burning feeling in the nose and nosebleeds.
  • Spray
    decongestants can make congestion worse if you use them more times in one day or more days than the label says.

Personal stories about choosing surgery for sinusitis

These stories are based on information gathered from health professionals and consumers. They may be helpful as you make important health decisions.

I have had
one sinus infection after another for the better part of a year. I've been
taking antibiotics and using steroids and decongestant nasal sprays for a month
now with no results. My doctor just did a CT scan and found out that one of my
sinuses is blocked. He says he can fix it with surgery.

Pete, age 43

I've had a couple of bouts of sinusitis
this year, so I asked my doctor about sinus surgery. She said there are some
stronger antibiotics and other treatments I should try. I agree that it's
better to try the medicines.

Misti, age 32

My doctor
fired all the medicines at this infection that she could, and I took them just
the way she told me to, but nothing seemed to work. After she looked at my CT
scan, my doctor thinks what I've got may be a fungal infection. That would
explain why the antibiotics I've tried haven't helped. I hate the idea of
having the surgery, but I have tried everything else.

Marona, age 54

I have
pretty bad sinusitis, and I've had it a few times over the years. The last time
I got it, my doctor prescribed antibiotics and showed me how to wash out my
sinuses with salt water, and that worked. I'm going to try that again, and my
doctor says there are some other things we can try, too, like nasal sprays and
allergy medicines.

Jonathan, age 29

What matters most to you?

Your personal feelings are just as important as the medical facts. Think about what matters most to you in this decision, and show how you feel about the following statements.

Reasons to have sinus surgery

Reasons to use home treatment

I want to do everything I can to stop my sinus infections.

I want to avoid surgery if at all possible.

More important
Equally important
More important

I'm not afraid of the risks of surgery.

I don't want to take any chance on problems from surgery.

More important
Equally important
More important

The pain and pressure in my sinuses is making me miserable.

I can control the pain and pressure with medicines.

More important
Equally important
More important

I'm tired of not breathing well.

I can still breathe well.

More important
Equally important
More important

My other important reasons:

My other important reasons:

More important
Equally important
More important

Where are you leaning now?

Now that you've thought about the facts and your feelings, you may have a general idea of where you stand on this decision. Show which way you are leaning right now.

Surgery

Home treatment

Leaning toward
Undecided
Leaning toward

What else do you need to make your decision?

Check the facts

1, Do most people need surgery to treat sinusitis?
2, Do you need to try several weeks of medicines and other treatment before you and you doctor decide about surgery?
3, Will you probably still have to take medicines and use nasal sprays after surgery?

Decide what's next

1,Do you understand the options available to you?
2,Are you clear about which benefits and side effects matter most to you?
3,Do you have enough support and advice from others to make a choice?

Certainty

1.
How sure do you feel right now about your decision?

Not sure at all
Somewhat sure
Very sure


Your Summary

Here's a record of your answers. You can use it to talk with your doctor or loved ones about your decision.

Your decision 

Next steps

Which way you're leaning

How sure you are

Your comments

Your knowledge of the facts 

Key concepts that you understood

Key concepts that may need review

Getting ready to act 

Patient choices

Credits and References

Credits
AuthorHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerPatrice Burgess, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerAdam Husney, MD - Family Medicine

References
Citations
  1. Suh JD, Chiu AG (2012). Acute and chronic sinusitis. In AK Lalwani, ed., Current Diagnosis and Treatment Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, 3rd ed., pp. 291–301. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  2. Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (2005). The diagnosis and management of sinusitis: A practice parameter update. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 116(6 Suppl): S13–S47.
You may want to have a say in this decision, or you may simply want to follow your doctor's recommendation. Either way, this information will help you understand what your choices are so that you can talk to your doctor about them.

Sinusitis: Should I Have Surgery?

Here's a record of your answers. You can use it to talk with your doctor or loved ones about your decision.
  1. Get the facts
  2. Compare your options
  3. What matters most to you?
  4. Where are you leaning now?
  5. What else do you need to make your decision?

1. Get the Facts

Your options

  • Have surgery to treat long-term (chronic)
    sinusitis.
  • Don't have surgery. Take
    medicines and use home treatment.

Key points to remember

  • Very few people need surgery for sinusitis. Most people can
    treat the problem with home care and medicines.
  • Surgery may be a good choice for people who have long-term
    (chronic) sinusitis. They may get one infection after another because something
    blocks the flow of mucus from the sinuses or because of another health problem.
    Surgery can remove blockages and make the sinus openings bigger. This helps the
    sinuses drain, preventing more infections.
  • To be sure that surgery is a good choice, you need to have a
    CT scan of your sinuses. This test will be done after
    you have followed what's called "maximum medical treatment" for 4 to 6 weeks.
    This means that you take medicines and follow home treatment to reduce
    infection and swelling. That helps your doctor see what's causing your
    infections.
  • You may need more than one surgery to fix your sinuses.
  • After surgery, you still may need to take medicines, such as
    antibiotics, and follow home treatment for a long time.
  • If you
    get chronic sinusitis because of
    allergies or another problem, you need to get that
    problem under control before you have surgery. You will have better results
    from surgery if you use medicine and home treatment after surgery to help to
    keep that problem under control.
FAQs

What is sinusitis?

Sinusitis is infection or
inflammation of the
mucous membranes that line the
sinuses .

When a mucous membrane gets
inflamed, it swells. This can block the normal flow of fluid from the sinuses
into the nose and throat. Bacteria and fungi (plural of fungus) are more likely
to grow and cause an infection in sinuses that can't drain.

The
main cause of sinusitis is a viral infection, usually a cold. Allergies or
other problems also can block the nasal passages and lead to sinusitis.

There are two types of sinusitis: acute (short-term) and chronic
(long-term). You may have chronic sinusitis if:

  • You have had more than three sinus infections
    in 1 year that needed antibiotics to clear up, OR
  • You have had a sinus infection for more than 12
    weeks that
    antibiotics have not cleared up.

Surgery may be a good choice for some people who have
chronic sinusitis.

What can surgery do for sinusitis?

Surgery helps
the sinuses drain, preventing infections. The doctor usually makes the sinus
openings bigger by removing:

  • Infected, swollen, or damaged
    tissue.
  • Bone, to make a wider opening to let mucus drain from the
    sinuses.
  • Growths (polyps) inside the nose or sinuses.

There are two types of sinus surgery:

  • Endoscopic surgery is the type
    that is done most often. The doctor puts a thin, lighted tool called an
    endoscope in the nose to remove small amounts of bone or tissue that block the
    sinus openings. The doctor also can remove polyps.

  • Traditional surgery may be done
    for certain serious problems—such as pus in a sinus, infection of the facial
    bones, or a brain
    abscess. The doctor makes an opening into the sinus
    from inside the mouth or through the skin of the face.

Sometimes another problem inside the nose (such as a
deviated septum ) also needs to be fixed. This may be done during the same
surgery.

After surgery, the doctor may recommend:

  • Antibiotics to help
    fight infection.
  • Steroid nasal spray to reduce inflammation and help you heal.

  • Pain medicine.

When is surgery needed for sinusitis?

Very few
people need surgery to treat sinusitis. But you may need surgery if
ALL of these are true:

  • Your doctor says that you have chronic
    sinusitis.
  • You've followed what's called "maximum medical
    treatment" for 4 to 6 weeks. This means that you've taken medicines and
    followed home treatment for at least 4 to 6 weeks. This treatment includes
    antibiotics, a
    steroid nasal spray, and other prescription
    medicines.
  • You've had a
    CT scan of your sinuses after the 4 to 6 weeks of
    treatment. It is very important to have the CT scan done after this treatment. Reducing the swelling and infection as
    much as possible lets your doctor see what could be causing your
    infections.
  • The CT scan shows that something, such as nasal polyps, is keeping your
    sinuses from draining as they should.

You also may need surgery if:

  • You have a sinus infection caused by a
    fungus. Infections caused by fungi cannot be cleared up with
    antibiotics.
  • You have a serious problem such as an infection that
    spreads beyond your sinuses. This is rare.

What are the benefits of sinus surgery?

Sinus
surgery can:

  • Help your sinuses drain, which can prevent
    sinus infections.
  • Improve your sense of smell. (But in some cases,
    scarring from surgery could decrease your sense of smell.)

Endoscopic surgery improves symptoms
for about 90 out of 100 people. About 10 out of 100 people find that it doesn't
help them.1

Surgery has the best chance
of working if you use a steroid nasal spray and do home treatment after surgery
to prevent future infections. You may need to use these treatments for a long
time.

What are the risks of sinus surgery?

Sinus surgery
can lead to minor or serious problems.

  • A small number of people have
    minor problems, such as:

    • Scar
      tissue.
    • Bleeding.
    • Infection.
    • A hole in the
      tissue between the nostrils (nasal septum).
    • Bruising and swelling
      around the eyes.
  • Serious but rare
    problems can include:

    • Heavy bleeding.
    • Injury to the
      eye area.
    • Inflammation of the tissue that covers the brain (meningitis).
    • Leakage of the fluid around
      the brain.
    • Brain injury.
  • Scarring from surgery could decrease your sense
    of smell.
  • The surgery might not work, so you could need a second surgery.

What can you do for sinusitis other than surgery?

Most of the time, you can treat your sinus problem with home care and
medicines.

Home treatment

  • Drink plenty of fluids
    to help keep the
    mucus thin.
  • Hold a warm, damp towel or a warm gel pack to your face for 5 to 10 minutes several
    times a day.
  • Breathe warm, moist air from a
    steamy shower, a hot bath, or a sink filled with hot water. Avoid very cool,
    dry air. A humidifier can add moisture to the air in your
    home.
  • Use saltwater nasal drops or washes to help
    keep your nasal passages open and to wash out mucus and bacteria. You can buy
    saline nose drops or saline nasal washes (such as a Neti Pot) at a drugstore or grocery store, or you can make your
    own at home. People around age 8 and older may also find it helpful to gargle often with warm salt water.
  • If you need to blow your nose, do it gently. Blowing your nose too hard may
    force thick mucus back into your sinuses. Keep both nostrils open when you blow
    your nose.

Medicines

  • Take pain relievers, such as
    acetaminophen or ibuprofen, that you can buy without a prescription.
  • Use a steroid nasal spray or decongestant nasal sprays or pills to reduce the swelling of the mucous membranes. If you use a nasal spray, do not use it longer than what the label says.
  • Take antibiotics as directed, if your doctor prescribes them.
    Antibiotics can treat most short-term (acute) sinusitis when it is caused by
    bacteria.

  • Use mucolytics (such as guaifenesin) to thin the mucus in your sinuses.

Be safe with medicines. Read and follow all instructions on the label. Some medicines may not be safe for young children or for people who have certain health problems.

Why might your doctor recommend surgery for sinusitis?

Your doctor might advise you to have surgery if:

  • You have many sinus infections that need
    treatment with antibiotics.
  • Home treatment doesn't stop your pain
    and other symptoms.
  • You've taken medicines and done home treatment
    for 4 to 6 weeks, and tests show that you have a sinus problem that surgery can
    fix.

2. Compare your options

  Have surgery for
sinusitis
Use home care for
sinusitis
What is usually involved?
  • You may be asleep. Or the doctor may
    numb the area (like at the dentist) and give you medicine to make you
    sleepy.
  • You may have some packing in your nose after surgery. Some types
    dissolve on their own. Gauze packing will need to be removed a few days after
    surgery.
  • You still need to take antibiotics and use steroid sprays after
    surgery to prevent infection.
  • You may have to sleep with your head
    raised for a few days.
  • You can't bend forward for a few days after surgery.
  • You take
    antibiotics for a bacterial infection.
  • You use
    steroid nasal sprays,
    decongestants, and
    over-the-counter pain medicines.
  • You do
    other self-care, such as washing your nasal passages with saline, putting a
    warm cloth on your face, and blowing your nose gently.
What are the benefits?
  • It may clear up your sinus pain and
    pressure.
  • Endoscopic surgery improves symptoms in about 90 out
    of 100 people.1
  • You may get rid of bad
    breath caused by sinus infections.
  • Home care may get rid of your sinus
    infections.
  • Antibiotics are effective for bacterial infections.
  • You don't have the risks of surgery.
  • You don't have
    the pain of surgery or need to deal with follow-up care.
  • You can decide later to have surgery if home care doesn't help
    you enough.
What are the risks and side effects?
  • You may have some pain and
    bleeding for 2 weeks after surgery.
  • You could have less sense of smell after
    surgery.
  • Serious but rare risks can include heavy bleeding,
    meningitis, and brain injury. But these happen in less
    than 1 out of 100 sinus surgeries. That means they don't happen more than 99 times
    out of 100.2
  • Surgery might not work. About
    10 out of 100 people find that it doesn't help.1
  • You could need to have another surgery.
  • Home care might not get
    rid of your sinus problem.
  • Antibiotics don't work for viral infections and don't work for all types of bacterial infections.
  • It won't fix certain serious problems, such as an infection in
    the bones of your face or a brain
    abscess.
  • Antibiotics can cause side
    effects, which may include
    allergic reaction, nausea, and
    diarrhea.
  • Steroid nasal sprays can cause side effects, which may
    include a burning feeling in the nose and nosebleeds.
  • Spray
    decongestants can make congestion worse if you use them more times in one day or more days than the label says.

Personal stories

Personal stories about choosing surgery for sinusitis

These stories are based on information gathered from health professionals and consumers. They may be helpful as you make important health decisions.

"I have had one sinus infection after another for the better part of a year. I've been taking antibiotics and using steroids and decongestant nasal sprays for a month now with no results. My doctor just did a CT scan and found out that one of my sinuses is blocked. He says he can fix it with surgery."

— Pete, age 43

"I've had a couple of bouts of sinusitis this year, so I asked my doctor about sinus surgery. She said there are some stronger antibiotics and other treatments I should try. I agree that it's better to try the medicines."

— Misti, age 32

"My doctor fired all the medicines at this infection that she could, and I took them just the way she told me to, but nothing seemed to work. After she looked at my CT scan, my doctor thinks what I've got may be a fungal infection. That would explain why the antibiotics I've tried haven't helped. I hate the idea of having the surgery, but I have tried everything else."

— Marona, age 54

"I have pretty bad sinusitis, and I've had it a few times over the years. The last time I got it, my doctor prescribed antibiotics and showed me how to wash out my sinuses with salt water, and that worked. I'm going to try that again, and my doctor says there are some other things we can try, too, like nasal sprays and allergy medicines."

— Jonathan, age 29

3. What matters most to you?

Your personal feelings are just as important as the medical facts. Think about what matters most to you in this decision, and show how you feel about the following statements.

Reasons to have sinus surgery

Reasons to use home treatment

I want to do everything I can to stop my sinus infections.

I want to avoid surgery if at all possible.

       
More important
Equally important
More important

I'm not afraid of the risks of surgery.

I don't want to take any chance on problems from surgery.

       
More important
Equally important
More important

The pain and pressure in my sinuses is making me miserable.

I can control the pain and pressure with medicines.

       
More important
Equally important
More important

I'm tired of not breathing well.

I can still breathe well.

       
More important
Equally important
More important

My other important reasons:

My other important reasons:

  
       
More important
Equally important
More important

4. Where are you leaning now?

Now that you've thought about the facts and your feelings, you may have a general idea of where you stand on this decision. Show which way you are leaning right now.

Surgery

Home treatment

       
Leaning toward
Undecided
Leaning toward

5. What else do you need to make your decision?

Check the facts

1.
Do most people need surgery to treat sinusitis?

  • Yes

  • No
  • I'm not sure

That's right. Very few people need surgery. Medicines and home care usually are enough.

2.
Do you need to try several weeks of medicines and other treatment before you and you doctor decide about surgery?

  • Yes
  • No

  • I'm not sure

That's right. You need to follow your doctor's plan of medicine and other treatment for 4 to 6 weeks. This treatment can reduce swelling so your doctor can see what is causing your sinus infections.

3.
Will you probably still have to take medicines and use nasal sprays after surgery?

  • Yes
  • No

  • I'm not sure

You're right. You may still have to take antibiotics and use steroid nasal sprays after surgery. They can help you heal and fight infection.

Decide what's next

1.
Do you understand the options available to you?

2.
Are you clear about which benefits and side effects matter most to you?

3.
Do you have enough support and advice from others to make a choice?

Certainty

1.
How sure do you feel right now about your decision?

     
Not sure at all
Somewhat sure
Very sure

2.
Check what you need to do before you make this decision.

  • I'm ready to take action.
  • I want to discuss the options with others.
  • I want to learn more about my options.

 

Credits
ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerPatrice Burgess, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerAdam Husney, MD - Family Medicine

References
Citations
  1. Suh JD, Chiu AG (2012). Acute and chronic sinusitis. In AK Lalwani, ed., Current Diagnosis and Treatment Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, 3rd ed., pp. 291–301. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  2. Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (2005). The diagnosis and management of sinusitis: A practice parameter update. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 116(6 Suppl): S13–S47.

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