Sexual Health

Sexual Health or Reproductive health implies that people are able to have a responsible, satisfying and safer sex life and that they have the capability to reproduce and the freedom to decide if, when and how often to do so. 

Birth Control Hormones: The Ring

What is the ring? The ring is used to prevent pregnancy. It’s a soft plastic ring that you put into your vagina. It’s also called the vaginal ring. The ring releases a regular dose of the hormones estrogen and progestin. These hormones prevent pregnancy in three ways. They thicken the mucus in the cervix. This makes it…

Birth Control Hormones: The Shot

What is the shot? The shot is used to prevent pregnancy. You get the shot in your upper arm or rear end (buttocks). The shot gives you a dose of the hormone progestin. The shot is often called by its brand name, Depo-Provera. Progestin prevents pregnancy in these ways: It thickens the mucus in the cervix. This makes it…

Birth Control Pills: Missed or Skipped Periods

It is not unusual for women who are taking hormone pills for birth control to have very light periods or no bleeding at all. If you have not missed any pills, skip 1 period, yet have no other signs of early pregnancy, it is very unlikely that you are pregnant. Signs of early pregnancy include fatigue, breast tenderness…

Birth Control: How to Use a Diaphragm

A diaphragm is a birth control device that blocks sperm from fertilizing an egg. It is made of rubber and shaped like a dome. It fits inside a woman’s vagina and covers the cervix (the opening of the uterus); a firm, flexible rim keeps it in place. A diaphragm is always used with a sperm-killing cream or jelly…

Birth Control: How to Use the Patch

The skin (transdermal) patch is a highly effective method of birth control when it is used exactly as directed. The patch failure rate is the same as that of birth control pills. Talk to your doctor about what day to start using the patch. It is usually recommended that the first patch be placed on the first day of your…