Workplace Health

Lead

This test measures the amount of lead in a person’s blood. Lead is a poisonous (toxic) metal that can damage the brain and other parts of the body. A lead test may be done on blood drawn from the vein, a finger (finger stick), or the heel (heel stick). A person can be exposed to lead: By eating or drinking…

Lead Poisoning

What is lead poisoning? Lead poisoning occurs when you absorb too much lead by breathing or swallowing a substance with lead in it, such as paint, dust, water, or food. Lead can damage almost every organ system. In children, too much lead in the body can cause lasting problems with growth and development. These can…

Lead Poisoning: Jobs and Hobbies That May Increase Risk

Lead poisoning is usually caused by months or years of exposure to small amounts of lead at home, work, or day care. It can also happen very quickly if you are exposed to high amounts of lead. Lead exposure can occur during work and hobbies if you breathe fumes and dust that contain lead. It can also happen if you…

Lead Poisoning: Tips for Those Who Work With Lead

To avoid lead poisoning if you have a job or hobby that may expose you to lead: Wash your hands a lot, and don’t eat or drink around possible lead sources. Follow U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) guidelines for protection from exposure to lead at work. Your employer should provide these…

Managing Job Stress

Covers major sources of job stress that can lead to burnout. Includes stressors such as lack of control or job insecurity. Looks at reducing stress by talking with your supervisor, managing time, unplugging from the office, and knowing when to quit.