Charleston Va Medical Center

Address

109 BEE STREET, CHARLESTON, SC 29401 USA

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Phone

(843) 577-5011
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109 BEE STREET, CHARLESTON, SC 29401 USA

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Consumer feedback about Charleston Va Medical Center

Evan Guthrie
Evan Guthrie

5 out of 5 stars

posted 2 months ago

The Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Hospital has been great to deal with every time I have visited. They make it very easy to find the patient you want to visit. They have plenty of self parking and even valet parking if necessary. The staff is very friendly, caring, and dedicated.

F. Spalti
F. Spalti

5 out of 5 stars

posted 3 months ago

My husband was in the VA for a week this month. I have nothing but praises for the Staff, Doctors and administration. My husband was in very serious condition and due to their concern and care he is doing well today. I must tell you that I have been to this same VA in past years with my father and it has come a long way from what it was in those days. Nothing and no one is perfect but we can pray to the one that is perfect for the hospital and it's staff that they will strive to do their best to take care of those who come there and put their trust and confidence in them.

George Rumbold
George Rumbold

5 out of 5 stars

posted 1 month ago

I had recent surgery at the Ralph H Johnson VAMC and the staff was world class. They were very kind and professional especially in addressing my questions and concerns. I'm 2 weeks post op and doing great!

DL LAFAYETTE
DL LAFAYETTE

2 out of 5 stars

posted 6 days ago

This facility and its employees as a whole, are very friendly, helpful, and care about veterans. Im not sure if every doctor or those in charge care though. After multiple visits evaluting the mental health section, I noticed many things. There are not enough mental health "specialist" to meet the demand of patients at times. Some mental health specialist seem to rush due to the amount of people in the waiting room.

There is also a great need for trust building because no vetetan wants to talk to doctors they cant trust. Inconsistencies between specialist, led me to distrust the service and judgement of a few. As a Marine, we understand how important it is to maintain trust, since it is a very hard thing to rebuild. I also noticed some specialist dont exactly comprehend the "transition phase" of leaving the military, combined with low income, a family, life, unsatifying job after job, not exactly fitting in with the world after 8 yrs around Marines, war, and a structured lifestyle. I think Im at my 14th or 15th place of employment since 2014 and it doesnt seem normal to me at this point. I left most of them within 3 weeks to a year or more because they seem to all bring on a slight "depression" or something similar. I thought maybe it was just the low-pay of jobs with no degree or exact skills, but I think theres more to it. That unacceptable if the veteran suicide stats are true. The "22" a day service members or vets that take their own lives.

No specialist asked me about the work force and transition. While most sit in cosy jobs that are set in-line with their lives, "theyve found their place", while many of us have restarted our lives multiple times, simply trying to find a career that pays the bills while not pulling our minds down further. I noticed some mental health specialist have no understanding of cultural adversity, ACEs "Adverse Childhood Experiences" isn't considered, and there is a great lack of care for our minds that were somewhat "transformed" by training, war, and moral brotherhood/ "other family". We often bounce from job to job trying to find a place in a job force that doesn't exactly match with us or our military training. This workforce doesnt always meet our mental or moral needs but they look at you as if youre just complaining when youre actually trying to figure out if every job is suppose to bring you to depression. A few doctors seem to think you just get out the military and its smooth sailing. Specialist didnt seem to comprehend, trying to figure out your own mind is challenging, but Ive figured out many things after a few times of being pushed to the side.

For almost 2 years now, Ive explored the depths of my own mind, after feeling ignored and pushed to the side by the agency that was suppose to give me some answers. I studied many veterans and their disorders, I looked back to my Marines that came back from war with serious debilitating issues, "some on medication" with multiple disorders. I thought back to their behavior and what they were going through, how they distanced themselves from everyone but myself at times. It helped me really see how PTSD is often misunderstood by civilian doctors.

Thia ficility broke my trust fully when one doctor told me there is a link between veterans/PTSD and memory loss, while the other said there is no link at all. So either one mental health specialist was lying, didnt care to look into it for a patient, or one of them was wrong. Either way there, were no further answers sent my way. At this point I dont trust the facility and I now know they are neglecting many veterans. If they would push me to the side, how many more will they ignore.

Maggie Donnelly
Maggie Donnelly

5 out of 5 stars

posted 1 month ago

Truly appreciate the care I received at the RHJohnson VA Medical Center in Charleston on 28 May 2019 in the GI Department on the 3rd Floor. Karen Long, Loretha Sarah, Susie, Lynn, Victoria, Anthony, Sam, and anyone else that I forgot, took such good care of me during my short 2 hour visit. Truly could not ask for a better team of healthcare providers. I can't say enough about how impressed I was with the facilities. For those who have never been, the Hall of Heroes on the first floor is a must see. The photographs of the men and women who served to protect our freedoms are beautifully displayed providing a glimpse at their past as well as their present.