Brian Leber MDCM FRCPC


Blood Type

Human blood is typed according to whether certain markers, called antigens, are present on the surface of red blood cells. The ABO system classifies blood as type A, B, AB, or O based on the presence or absence of the A and B antigens; the Rh system classifies blood as negative or positive based on the presence or…

Aplastic Anemia

Aplastic anemia is a rare condition in which the bone marrow is unable to produce blood cells normally. The production of just some blood cells (such as red blood cells only) may be affected, or the production of all types of blood cells may be decreased. Symptoms of aplastic anemia include: Fatigue, weakness, or lack…

Hemarthrosis

Hemarthrosis is bleeding into a joint. It often causes inflammation and pain. Hemarthrosis is more likely to occur in people with bleeding disorders, such as hemophilia (a rare inherited condition), or in those who take a medicine (called a blood thinner) that prevents blood clots. It also can develop after an injury to…

Polycythemia

Polycythemia is an abnormal increase in the number of red blood cells produced by the bone marrow. The extra numbers of red blood cells cause blood to thicken and may increase the risk of blood clots that may cause heart attacks or strokes. Treatment for polycythemia (also called erythrocythemia) sometimes involves…

Thalassemia

What is thalassemia? Thalassemia (say “thal-uh-SEE-mee-uh”) is an inherited blood disorder that causes your body to make less hemoglobin or abnormal hemoglobin. Hemoglobin helps red blood cells spread oxygen through your body. Low levels of hemoglobin may cause anemia, an illness that makes you feel weak and tired…