Carol L. Karp MD


Retinal Tear

A retinal tear is a tear, or hole, in the nerve layer at the back of your eye (your retina). You can get a tear from an eye or head injury. Or you can get a tear if there is a problem inside your eye, such as from a disease. If you have a retinal tear, you may notice “floaters” or flashes of light, or both. A retinal…

Sudden Changes in Vision

Vision changes may indicate a serious problem with the tissue that lines the back of the eyeball (retina), optic nerve, or blood vessels in the eye . Evaluation by a health professional is needed right away for sudden vision changes, such as: Flashes of light (photopsia). Photopsia is brief but recurrent streaks…

Retina

The retina is a thin nerve membrane that detects light entering the eye. Nerve cells in the retina send signals of what the eye sees along the optic nerve to the brain. The retina lines the back two-thirds of the eye and is made up of two layers: the sensory retina and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The macula…

Retinitis Pigmentosa

Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited eye disease in which there is a breakdown of the nerve layer (retina) in the back of the eye. It can lead to blindness. Often the first sign of the disorder is an inability to see in low light and darkness (night blindness). Those affected usually develop a ring-shaped blind spot…

Flashes of Light

Flashes of light are “sparks” that you may see when you move your head. They can happen when the vitreous gel in your eye pulls or tugs (causes traction) on the retina. This creates nerve impulses that appear as flashes of light. The flashes are easier to see when your eyes are closed or you are looking at a dark area…