Carol L. Karp MD


Traction Retinal Detachment

Traction retinal detachment is a pulling away of the retina from the layer of eye tissue beneath it. This can occur in people who have scar tissue or other abnormal growths on the retina. The retina is a thin layer of nerve cells that line the back of the eye. It detects light entering the eye and converts it into nerve…

Sudden Changes in Vision

Vision changes may indicate a serious problem with the tissue that lines the back of the eyeball (retina), optic nerve, or blood vessels in the eye . Evaluation by a health professional is needed right away for sudden vision changes, such as: Flashes of light (photopsia). Photopsia is brief but recurrent streaks…

Uveitis

Uveitis is an inflammation, or swelling and tenderness, of the middle layer of the eye. This area includes the colored part of the eye (iris), muscles, and blood vessels. Uveitis may develop in people who have: Other diseases that cause chronic inflammation, such as rheumatoid arthritis or inflammatory bowel disease. A…

Retinal Detachment

Retinal detachment means that the retina—a thin layer of nerve tissue at the back of your eye—has detached, or pulled away. This can lead to vision loss and blindness. A retina can detach as a result of aging, an eye injury, inflammation, or some diseases such as diabetes. But many times there is no obvious cause…

Retinal Tear

A retinal tear is a tear, or hole, in the nerve layer at the back of your eye (your retina). You can get a tear from an eye or head injury. Or you can get a tear if there is a problem inside your eye, such as from a disease. If you have a retinal tear, you may notice “floaters” or flashes of light, or both. A retinal…