Christopher Joseph Rudnisky MD MPH FRCSC


Glaucoma Screening

If you are younger than 40 and have no known risk factors for glaucoma, the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) recommends that you have a complete eye exam every 5 to 10 years. This includes tests that check for glaucoma. 1 The AAO suggests more frequent routine eye exams as you age. The AAO also suggests that…

Laser Photocoagulation for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

The main treatment for wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD) is injections of medicines into the eye. But in some cases, doctors recommend laser surgery. Retinal laser photocoagulation is a type of laser surgery that uses an intense beam of light to burn small areas of the retina . The burns form scar tissue…

Keratoconus

Keratoconus is an eye disease that causes progressive thinning of the central cornea (the clear “window” of the eye). This gives the cornea a cone-shaped appearance and leads to blurred vision. Keratoconus is a hereditary condition that first appears in the late teen years. If you have keratoconus, contact lenses can…

Nearsightedness

Nearsightedness is most often caused by a natural change in the shape of the eyeball that makes the eyeball too long, so that it is egg-shaped instead of round. This causes light entering the eye to focus in front of the retina instead of directly on the retina, causing blurry vision. In a person with nearsightedness…

Gradual Changes in Vision

Vision changes that occur gradually over time or that seem to come and go are usually less serious than changes that occur suddenly and persist. Sudden changes that happen in only one eye are usually the most serious. Any sudden loss of vision lasting for more than a few seconds is a serious symptom that requires…