Douglas A. Stewart MD FRCPC


Types of Breast Forms

Breast forms come in many shapes and sizes, depending on what you need. Upper left: Special mastectomy bras have built-in pockets to hold full or partial breast forms in place. Upper right: Some full breast forms have an adhesive backing so that they stick to the skin. They can be worn with a regular bra or without a…

Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia

Atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) is an abnormal production of cells within the duct system of the breast. Women who have atypical ductal hyperplasia have an increased risk of breast cancer. Atypical ductal hyperplasia is usually discovered by mammography and diagnosed with a biopsy of the breast. Women who have ADH are…

Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS)

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is the growth of abnormal cells in the milk ducts of the breast. It is a very early form of noninvasive breast cancer. DCIS is seen as small calcium deposits (microcalcifications) on a mammogram.

PARP Inhibitors

PARP inhibitors are used in cancer treatment. PARP stands for poly (ADP ribose) polymerase. It’s a protein that is part of the body’s natural process to repair DNA in cells. So medicines that inhibit, or prevent, this protein from repairing DNA can help kill cancer cells. When you get chemotherapy or radiation…

Lobular Carcinoma in Situ (LCIS)

Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is a type of noninvasive breast cancer that is confined to the cells lining the very end of the milk ducts (lobules) in the breast. LCIS has some of the characteristics of cancer cells but does not invade surrounding breast tissue or other structures. LCIS is usually located in more than…