G. Frederick Wooten MD


Parkinson’s Disease and Freezing

In Parkinson’s disease, freezing (sometimes called motor block) is a sudden, brief inability to start movement or to continue rhythmic, repeated movements, such as finger-tapping, writing, or walking. Freezing most often affects walking, but it also can affect speech, writing, and the person’s ability to open and close…

Parkinson’s Disease and Exercise

Exercise is an important part of home treatment for people with Parkinson’s disease. It has benefits in both early and advanced stages of the disease. Regular exercise can help you: Keep and improve muscle strength and endurance. Control your weight and improve your cardiovascular fitness. Improve your balance…

Parkinson’s Disease: Other Symptoms

Most people know that Parkinson’s disease is a condition that affects how you move. But the breakdown of nerve cells in Parkinson’s disease can cause other symptoms. These other symptoms, also called “non-motor” symptoms, include: Constipation. This is a common problem, mostly related to the breakdown of the nerve cells…

Parkinson’s Disease and Speech Problems

Parkinson’s disease can affect the muscles of the lips, tongue, throat, voice box (larynx), and lungs, all of which are involved in producing speech. Stiff, slow muscles in these areas may lead to: Low voice volume or soft speech. Imprecise speech sounds. Speaking too fast or too slow. Monotonous voice. Hoarseness. A…

Parkinson’s Disease: Modifying Your Activities and Your Home

When you have Parkinson’s disease, you may find that making simple changes to your home and in your daily activities can help you stay independent for a longer time. Make daily activities simpler Simplifying your daily activities may help you to save your energy for activities that really demand it. It also may help to…