H. Michael O'Connor MD


Crying, Age 3 and Younger

Crying lets others know when a young child is hungry, wet, tired, too warm, too cold, lonely, or in pain. If your child is crying, try to identify the type of cry. It helps to go through a mental checklist of what might be wrong—but remember that there may be nothing bothering your child—and to make sure your child is…

First Aid for Tar or Plastic Burns

Immediately run cold water over the hot tar or hot plastic to cool the tar or plastic and stop the burning. Do not attempt to peel the tar or plastic off after it has cooled. This may remove skin that is stuck to the tar or plastic. To remove tar or plastic, loosen it with mineral oil or ointments such as Vaseline or…

Acid Burns

Acid products include toilet cleaners, battery acid, bleach, chemicals used in industry for crystal etching, and chemicals that are added to gas. Acid solids and liquids can cause injury, depending on the type, the strength, and the length of time the acid is in contact with the body. The damage is usually kept to the…

Crying Child That Is Not Acting Normally

Crying is a child’s first way of communicating. Parents and caregivers become better over time at identifying their child’s cry. Along with crying, a child may not act normally when something is wrong with him or her. Infection, illness, injury or pain, or a medical problem may cause a child to not act normally. If your…

Home Remedies for Bites and Stings

Home remedies may help to relieve the pain of an insect bite. While they haven’t been proven scientifically, many people report relief. You can try one or more and see whether they help you. Apply calamine lotion, underarm deodorant, or witch hazel to the bite. Soak the bite site in Epsom salt and water.