John M. Miller MD FACC


Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation

Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is a type of atrial fibrillation, an irregular heart rhythm. Paroxysmal means that the atrial fibrillation episodes last 7 days or less. The episodes may go away on their own or they go away after treatment. Typically, over time, episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation come on more…

Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD)

A doctor places an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (also called an ICD) in the chest. The ICD has one or two wires called leads. These leads go into the heart through the subclavian vein (transvenous). Some ICDs have a lead that is placed under the skin so that it lies near your heart (subcutaneous). The ICD…

Pacemaker for heart failure (cardiac resynchronization therapy)

A pacemaker for heart failure, used for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), sends electrical pulses to the heart to keep the lower chambers (the ventricles) pumping together. This type of pacemaker is also called a biventricular pacemaker. A doctor places the pacemaker in the chest. The pacemaker has three wires…

Permanent pacemaker

A pacemaker is a small, battery-powered device that sends out small electrical impulses to make the heart beat in a regular rhythm and at a normal speed. A pacemaker consists of a pulse generator and battery that create the electrical impulses. Most pacemakers have wires (leads) that transmit electricity to the heart. A…