Kirtly Jones MD


Breastfeeding

Top of the pageBreastfeedingBreastfeeding is feeding a baby breast milk directly from the breast or from a bottle after expressing the milk with a pump. Breast milk provides the best nutrition for a baby in the first 6 months of life. Other foods, such as cereal, are...

Placenta

The placenta is a large organ that develops in the uterus during pregnancy and is connected to the fetus by the umbilical cord. Through the blood vessels in the umbilical cord and placenta, the fetus receives oxygen and nutrients from the mother and gets rid of wastes. The placenta is delivered soon after the baby is…

Prostaglandins

Prostaglandins are a group of chemicals made by nearly all of the body’s cell membranes. Different prostaglandins have different effects on the body; they can help cause inflammation and pain, raise or lower blood pressure, stimulate uterine contractions and labor, and affect the immune system, nerve impulses, and body…

Quitting Smoking and Avoiding Smoke During Pregnancy

When you’re pregnant, everything you put in your body can affect your baby. If you smoke, your baby is exposed to chemicals such as nicotine and carbon monoxide. If you’re a smoker and get pregnant, now is the time to quit. If you’re not a smoker, avoid secondhand smoke. If you smoke and aren’t pregnant but are thinking…

Breastfeeding and Your Milk Supply

A number of things influence how much milk you produce (your milk supply). The two most important things are how often you breastfeed and how well your breast is emptied. The hormone that regulates milk production ( prolactin ) is stimulated by breastfeeding. So the more frequently you feed your baby and empty your…