Martin Steinberg MD


Sickle Cell Disease: Splenic Sequestration

What is splenic sequestration? Splenic sequestration is a problem with the spleen that can happen in people who have sickle cell disease. Splenic sequestration happens when a lot of sickled red blood cells become trapped in the spleen. The spleen can enlarge, get damaged, and not work as it should. When the spleen…

Sickle Cell Trait

What is sickle cell trait? Sickle cell trait occurs when a person inherits a sickle cell gene from just one parent. It’s not the same as sickle cell disease, in which a person inherits two sickle cell genes, one from each parent. People with sickle cell disease have just one kind of hemoglobin (hemoglobin S), which…

Sickle Cell Disease: Vision Problems

People who have sickle cell disease can sometimes have vision problems. Blood cells that change shape, or “sickle,” can get trapped in blood vessels, blocking the blood flow. When this blockage occurs in the small blood vessels in the inner lining ( retina ) of the eyes, it can cause vision problems. This most often…

Sickle Cell Crisis

What is a sickle cell crisis? A sickle cell crisis is a painful episode that may begin suddenly in a person who has sickle cell disease. A sickle cell crisis occurs when sickle-shaped red blood cells clump together and block small blood vessels that carry blood to certain organs, muscles, and bones. This causes mild to…

Sickle Cell Disease: Aplastic Crisis

If a person with sickle cell disease is infected with parvovirus, the virus that causes fifth disease in children, an aplastic crisis may develop. Bone marrow suddenly stops producing red blood cells, which results in sudden and severe anemia. During this time, a person will often feel tired, have pale skin, and be…