Nancy E. Greenwald MD


Areas the Nerves Control

The nerves in the area of a vertebra control specific parts of the body. For example, the 7th cervical nerve (C7) in the neck area controls the triceps (the muscle in the upper arm), while the thoracic nerves (T2 through T7) control the chest muscles. In a spinal cord injury, complete or partial paralysis occurs in the…

Spinal Cord Injury: Safe Transfers To or From a Wheelchair

After your spinal cord injury (SCI), you may need a wheelchair. Moving from your wheelchair to other locations is known as a transfer. If you have enough upper body strength, you may be able to do this yourself. Your injury and strength will determine what type of transfer you do. But there are general things that are…

Spinal Cord Injury: Adapting Your Home

When you leave a rehabilitation (rehab) center for your home after a spinal cord injury (SCI), you need to have your home ready for your special needs. Following are some of the adaptations and adaptive equipment you may need. Talk with your rehab team about what you will need specifically and the best way to proceed…

Mobility After a Spinal Cord Injury

Mobility is an important aspect of a spinal cord injury (SCI). The ability to move lets you participate more fully in community life and do the things you would like to do. You are not “confined” to crutches or wheelchairs—they make you independent. Mobility devices can help you get to work, go shopping, and get around…

Spinal Cord Injury: Breathing Practice

Lung and breathing problems are common in a spinal cord injury (SCI). This is because you may not be able to use some of the muscles necessary for breathing, or they may be very weak. This makes it difficult to breath, cough, and bring up mucus from the lungs, which leads to a greater risk of lung infections such as…