Susan C. Kim MD


Osgood-Schlatter Disease: Strengthening Exercises

Straight-leg raises to the front Lie on your back with your good knee bent so that your foot rests flat on the floor. Your affected leg should be straight. Make sure that your low back has a normal curve. You should be able to slip your hand in between the floor and the small of your back, with your palm touching the…

Rectal Temperature

A rectal thermometer is the most accurate way to take a temperature. To take a rectal temperature: Apply a lubricant jelly or petroleum jelly, such as Vaseline, on the bulb of the thermometer, so that you can insert it easily. Choose a quiet place so that the child won’t be distracted or move around too much. When…

Body Temperature

Body temperature is a measure of your body’s ability to make and get rid of heat. The body is very good at keeping its temperature within a safe range, even when temperatures outside the body change a lot. When you are too hot, the blood vessels in your skin widen to carry the excess heat to your skin’s surface. You may…

Knee: Osgood-Schlatter Disease

Osgood-Schlatter disease is a knee problem that causes pain and swelling in the shinbone (tibia) just below the kneecap (patella). This is the spot where the patellar tendon attaches to a bony mound in the knee called the tibial tubercle. The disease is caused by too much stress on the muscles and tendons that support…

Thermometers

These are examples of commonly used thermometers. Ear thermometers use infrared energy to measure body temperature. The small cone-shaped end of the thermometer is placed in the ear, and body temperature shows on the digital display. The results appear within seconds. Some models also show the corresponding oral and…