Uterine Fibroids: Should I Have Uterine Fibroid Embolization?

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Uterine Fibroids: Should I Have Uterine Fibroid Embolization?

You may want to have a say in this decision, or you may simply want to follow your doctor's recommendation. Either way, this information will help you understand what your choices are so that you can talk to your doctor about them.

Uterine Fibroids: Should I Have Uterine Fibroid Embolization?

Get the facts

Your options

  • Have uterine fibroid embolization to treat your
    symptoms.
  • Choose another treatment, such as
    over-the-counter pain medicine, hormones, or surgery.

This decision aid is for women who have decided to
treat their uterine fibroids. Many fibroids don't need treatment.

If you've decided to treat your uterine fibroids, you may also need to make a decision about GnRH-A hormone therapy or a decision about surgery.

Key points to remember

  • Uterine fibroid embolization (or uterine artery
    embolization) shrinks or destroys a fibroid by cutting off its blood supply.
    About 80
    out of 100 women who have the procedure get relief from their
    symptoms, while 20 out of 100 don't.footnote 1
  • Embolization doesn't always cure
    fibroids.
  • You may want to
    have this procedure if your symptoms haven't improved with other
    treatments.
  • You may recover more quickly after embolization than
    after
    hysterectomy.
  • This procedure can have
    risks and side effects. These include infection, early
    menopause, and pain that in rare cases could last for
    months.
  • This procedure may not be a good choice if you want to get
    pregnant. It's possible to get pregnant afterward, but it's uncertain how good
    the odds are. This procedure does have a risk of damaging an ovary or the
    uterus, which would make it much harder to get pregnant. There may be a higher
    risk for pregnancy problems.
  • Fibroids usually get better on their
    own after
    menopause. If you are near menopause, you could try
    hormone therapy for a while.
FAQs

What are uterine fibroids?

Uterine fibroids are
growths in the
uterus. They are not cancer.
Fibroids can grow on the
inside of the uterus,
within the muscle wall of the uterus, or on the
outer surface of the uterus. They can change the shape of the uterus as they
grow. This can make it hard for you to get pregnant, or it can cause problems
during a pregnancy.

Over time, the size, shape, location, and
symptoms of fibroids may change.

As women get older, they are more
likely to have uterine fibroids, especially from their 30s and 40s until
menopause.
Most have mild or no symptoms. But fibroids can cause bad
pain, bleeding, and other problems.

The cause of
fibroids is not known. But the hormones
estrogen and
progesterone can make them grow. A woman's body makes
the highest levels of these hormones during her childbearing years. After
menopause, when hormone levels decrease, fibroids often shrink or
disappear.

When do fibroids need to be treated?

Uterine
fibroids usually need treatment when they cause:

  • Anemia from
    heavy fibroid bleeding.
  • Ongoing low back pain or a feeling of
    pressure in the lower belly.
  • Trouble getting pregnant.
  • Problems during a past
    pregnancy, such as
    miscarriage or preterm labor.
  • Problems with the urinary tract or
    bowels.
  • Infection, if the tissue of a large fibroid dies.

Depending on the reasons you need treatment, one type of
treatment may work better for you than another.

What is uterine fibroid embolization?

Uterine fibroid embolization is a procedure that blocks blood flow to fibroids in the
uterus. It's not surgery.
Fibroids treated with this procedure shrink
by about half.footnote 2

The doctor
(a
radiologist) puts a thin, flexible tube called a
catheter into a blood vessel in your upper thigh (femoral artery). Then the
doctor injects a substance called contrast material into the catheter. He or
she uses an X-ray on a video screen to see the arteries and guide the catheter
to the arteries that supply blood to the fibroid. Small particles are injected
into those uterine arteries through the catheter. These particles build up in
the arteries and block blood flow to the fibroid. The rest of the uterus
usually isn't harmed, because it's supplied by other arteries.

When is embolization an option to treat uterine fibroids?

Uterine fibroid embolization can be used to control
heavy, long-lasting menstrual bleeding when:

  • You have tried hormones, but they didn't relieve your symptoms.
  • You don't plan to get pregnant. This treatment is a choice for women who
    have no plans to get pregnant.
    That's because some women have had damage to an ovary, have
    gone into early
    menopause, or had trouble getting pregnant after the
    procedure.

  • You don't want to have
    surgery
    (myomectomy or
    hysterectomy). You would need only
    local anesthesia for this procedure. And the doctor
    doesn't have to make any cuts in your skin. For most women, this means no
    hospital stay and a quicker return to normal activities, compared to
    surgery.footnote 3
  • You have other health problems, such as severe lung or liver disease, that make it
    risky for you to have surgery or use hormones.

How well does this procedure work to treat uterine fibroids?

Embolization
usually works well to treat fibroids. Short-term studies show
that:footnote 1

  • About 80 out of 100 women who had it said
    that their symptoms got better, while 20 out of 100 said
    their symptoms didn't get better.
  • It shrinks fibroids an average of about 50%.footnote 1

But the results don't always last: In one study, nearly 1 out of 4 women who had embolization needed another one or a
hysterectomy within the next couple of years.footnote 4

What are the risks of this procedure?

The chance
of a problem after
embolization is low. But the risks include:

  • Infection. This is the
    most serious possible problem. In rare cases, an emergency hysterectomy is
    needed to treat an infected uterus.
  • Early menopause.
  • Scar tissue (adhesions).
  • Pain that in rare cases could last for months.

Although some women can get pregnant after this
procedure, experts don't yet fully know the risks to pregnancy.

If you're thinking of having this procedure, look
for a
radiologist who has done it many times with few
problems.

Why might your doctor recommend fibroid embolization?

Your doctor might recommend this procedure if:

  • You've tried hormones, and they didn't work
    for you.
  • You have another health problem that makes surgery or
    hormones too risky.
  • You don't plan to get pregnant.

Compare your options

Compare

What is usually involved?

What are the benefits?

What are the risks and side effects?

Have embolization

Have embolization

  • You have
    local anesthesia so that you won't feel pain, and you
    get medicine to make you sleepy.
  • You will probably go home the same day, or you might spend the
    night in the hospital.
  • You probably can return to your usual
    activities in 7 to 10 days.
  • It may relieve your
    symptoms.
  • You probably would have a shorter recovery than you would
    with a
    hysterectomy.
  • Possible but
    rare problems include:

    • Infection.
    • Early
      menopause.
    • Damage to the uterus or an
      ovary. This could make it harder to get pregnant.
    • Fibroids can grow back.
    • If your fibroids are large, embolization may not shrink the fibroid enough to make your symptoms go away.
    • Pain that could last for months. This is rare.
Don't have this
procedure

Don't have this
procedure

  • You could take
    over-the-counter pain medicine.
  • You could take hormones (GnRH-a) as a
    stand-alone treatment or before surgery to shrink fibroids. They're given as a
    shot or a nasal spray.
  • You could have surgery to take out your
    fibroids only (myomectomy) or your uterus (hysterectomy).
    (If you have a hysterectomy, you won't be able to get pregnant
    afterward.)
  • Hysterectomy would
    cure your fibroids.
  • Myomectomy could control your symptoms and give you the best
    chance to get pregnant later.
  • Hormones could control your symptoms
    for a short time if you are near menopause, when fibroid problems usually go
    away.
  • Surgery
    has risks, including bleeding and infection.
  • GnRH-a has side effects, such as:
    • Symptoms like those of menopause, such as
      hot flashes and vaginal dryness.
    • Possible bone loss if you take it
      for more than 6 months.
  • GnRH-a can be used only for a few months.
  • Fibroids can grow back after myomectomy or when you stop taking
    hormones.

Personal stories about uterine fibroid embolization

These stories are based on information gathered from health professionals and consumers. They may be helpful as you make important health decisions.

I have had
pain before and during my period for years. In the past year or so I started
having really heavy bleeding, and my periods were lasting longer than usual. I
tried nonprescription and prescription medicines to control the bleeding.
Nothing was working. My doctor suggested a procedure called uterine fibroid
embolization. I had the procedure, and my doctor was able to treat the
fibroids. It didn't hurt too much, and I was surprised at how quickly I
recovered. It has been 6 months now, and I no longer have those days of heavy
bleeding. I am glad I had uterine fibroid embolization.

Marlena, age 43

Over the past 3 or 4 years, my periods have
been getting heavier and heavier. My doctor did a bunch of tests and thought
that uterine fibroids may be causing my symptoms. He suggested that I have a
procedure called uterine fibroid embolization to control my bleeding. The
procedure sounded scary, so I asked if waiting a few months would be dangerous.
He said waiting would be fine. After a few months, my periods eased up. I am
glad I decided to wait and see if my bleeding decreased before having the
procedure.

Angie, age
44

About 3 years ago, my menstrual periods
really changed for the worse. I began having cramps, and my periods were heavy
with clotting and lasted for 2 weeks. I thought, "No way was that a totally
normal period," and I made an appointment with my doctor. I tried a bunch of
different medicines and nothing seemed to make much difference. After lots of
further testing and discussion I had uterine fibroid embolization. I figure
that since I don't want any more kids, any risk of losing my fertility is okay.
The procedure was quick, and I was completely recovered in about 3 days. I had
some pretty severe cramping afterwards, but it only lasted for about 12 hours
and got better with ibuprofen. The embolization worked but I still have some
odd cycles in that I bleed too many days per month, I get clotting some cycles,
and some of my periods are heavier. My doctor says I may have to have another
embolization, but I think it will be worth it.

Raquel, age 32

A couple of
years ago I started having heavy, painful periods. My doctor said she thought I
might have something I had never even heard of called uterine fibroids.
Apparently they are pretty common as you get older. My doctor outlined all the
different treatments I could try, including something called uterine fibroid
embolization, if it ever got really bad. She said that I might consider starting
with birth control pills and that I could try ibuprofen for a few days right before my
period starts and then for several days during my period, to help control the
bleeding. The embolization sounded pretty risky—I don't know if I could ever do
that. Lucky for me, the birth control pills and ibuprofen have helped a lot. In
fact, my doctor says that means the bleeding was more of a menstrual problem
than a fibroid problem!

June, age 38

What matters most to you?

Your personal feelings are just as important as the medical facts. Think about what matters most to you in this decision, and show how you feel about the following statements.

Reasons to have uterine fibroid embolization

Reasons to choose another treatment

I don't want to have surgery or take hormones.

I would rather have surgery or take hormones.

More important
Equally important
More important

I don't plan to get pregnant.

I would like to be able to get pregnant after treatment.

More important
Equally important
More important

I want a shorter recovery.

I don't mind taking time to recover after surgery.

More important
Equally important
More important

I'm not close to menopause.

I'm close to menopause.

More important
Equally important
More important

I'm not worried about possible risks such as infection or pain.

I'm concerned about possible side effects from the procedure.

More important
Equally important
More important

My other important reasons:

My other important reasons:

More important
Equally important
More important

Where are you leaning now?

Now that you've thought about the facts and your feelings, you may have a general idea of where you stand on this decision. Show which way you are leaning right now.

Having embolization

NOT having embolization

Leaning toward
Undecided
Leaning toward

What else do you need to make your decision?

Check the facts

1, Uterine fibroid embolization could be a good choice for me, because I don't plan to have more children.
2, I can recover more quickly after embolization than after surgery.
3, Embolization will fix my fibroids for good.

Decide what's next

1,Do you understand the options available to you?
2,Are you clear about which benefits and side effects matter most to you?
3,Do you have enough support and advice from others to make a choice?

Certainty

1.
How sure do you feel right now about your decision?

Not sure at all
Somewhat sure
Very sure


Your Summary

Here's a record of your answers. You can use it to talk with your doctor or loved ones about your decision.

Your decision 

Next steps

Which way you're leaning

How sure you are

Your comments

Your knowledge of the facts 

Key concepts that you understood

Key concepts that may need review

Getting ready to act 

Patient choices

Credits and References

Credits
Author Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer Sarah Marshall, MD - Family Medicine
Primary Medical Reviewer Kathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
Primary Medical Reviewer Martin J. Gabica, MD - Family Medicine
Primary Medical Reviewer Elizabeth T. Russo, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Divya Gupta, MD - Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gynecologic Oncology

References
Citations
  1. Practice Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Society of Reproductive Surgeons (2008). Myomas and reproductive function. Fertility and Sterility, 90(3): S125–S130.
  2. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (2008, reaffirmed 2012). Alternatives to hysterectomy in the management of leiomyomas. ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 96. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 112(2, Part 1): 387–399.
  3. Gupta JK, et al. (2012). Uterine artery embolization for symptomatic uterine fibroids. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (5).
  4. Lethaby A, Vollenhoven B (2015). Fibroids (uterine myomatosis, leiomyomas). BMJ Clinical Evidence. http://clinicalevidence.bmj.com/x/systematic-review/0814/overview.html. Accessed April 15, 2016.
You may want to have a say in this decision, or you may simply want to follow your doctor's recommendation. Either way, this information will help you understand what your choices are so that you can talk to your doctor about them.

Uterine Fibroids: Should I Have Uterine Fibroid Embolization?

Here's a record of your answers. You can use it to talk with your doctor or loved ones about your decision.
  1. Get the facts
  2. Compare your options
  3. What matters most to you?
  4. Where are you leaning now?
  5. What else do you need to make your decision?

1. Get the Facts

Your options

  • Have uterine fibroid embolization to treat your
    symptoms.
  • Choose another treatment, such as
    over-the-counter pain medicine, hormones, or surgery.

This decision aid is for women who have decided to
treat their uterine fibroids. Many fibroids don't need treatment.

If you've decided to treat your uterine fibroids, you may also need to make a decision about GnRH-A hormone therapy or a decision about surgery.

Key points to remember

  • Uterine fibroid embolization (or uterine artery
    embolization) shrinks or destroys a fibroid by cutting off its blood supply.
    About 80
    out of 100 women who have the procedure get relief from their
    symptoms, while 20 out of 100 don't.1
  • Embolization doesn't always cure
    fibroids.
  • You may want to
    have this procedure if your symptoms haven't improved with other
    treatments.
  • You may recover more quickly after embolization than
    after
    hysterectomy.
  • This procedure can have
    risks and side effects. These include infection, early
    menopause, and pain that in rare cases could last for
    months.
  • This procedure may not be a good choice if you want to get
    pregnant. It's possible to get pregnant afterward, but it's uncertain how good
    the odds are. This procedure does have a risk of damaging an ovary or the
    uterus, which would make it much harder to get pregnant. There may be a higher
    risk for pregnancy problems.
  • Fibroids usually get better on their
    own after
    menopause. If you are near menopause, you could try
    hormone therapy for a while.
FAQs

What are uterine fibroids?

Uterine fibroids are
growths in the
uterus. They are not cancer.
Fibroids can grow on the
inside of the uterus ,
within the muscle wall of the uterus , or on the
outer surface of the uterus . They can change the shape of the uterus as they
grow. This can make it hard for you to get pregnant, or it can cause problems
during a pregnancy.

Over time, the size, shape, location, and
symptoms of fibroids may change.

As women get older, they are more
likely to have uterine fibroids, especially from their 30s and 40s until
menopause.
Most have mild or no symptoms. But fibroids can cause bad
pain, bleeding, and other problems.

The cause of
fibroids is not known. But the hormones
estrogen and
progesterone can make them grow. A woman's body makes
the highest levels of these hormones during her childbearing years. After
menopause, when hormone levels decrease, fibroids often shrink or
disappear.

When do fibroids need to be treated?

Uterine
fibroids usually need treatment when they cause:

  • Anemia from
    heavy fibroid bleeding.
  • Ongoing low back pain or a feeling of
    pressure in the lower belly.
  • Trouble getting pregnant.
  • Problems during a past
    pregnancy, such as
    miscarriage or preterm labor.
  • Problems with the urinary tract or
    bowels.
  • Infection, if the tissue of a large fibroid dies.

Depending on the reasons you need treatment, one type of
treatment may work better for you than another.

What is uterine fibroid embolization?

Uterine fibroid embolization is a procedure that blocks blood flow to fibroids in the
uterus. It's not surgery.
Fibroids treated with this procedure shrink
by about half.2

The doctor
(a
radiologist) puts a thin, flexible tube called a
catheter into a blood vessel in your upper thigh (femoral artery). Then the
doctor injects a substance called contrast material into the catheter. He or
she uses an X-ray on a video screen to see the arteries and guide the catheter
to the arteries that supply blood to the fibroid. Small particles are injected
into those uterine arteries through the catheter. These particles build up in
the arteries and block blood flow to the fibroid. The rest of the uterus
usually isn't harmed, because it's supplied by other arteries.

When is embolization an option to treat uterine fibroids?

Uterine fibroid embolization can be used to control
heavy, long-lasting menstrual bleeding when:

  • You have tried hormones, but they didn't relieve your symptoms.
  • You don't plan to get pregnant. This treatment is a choice for women who
    have no plans to get pregnant.
    That's because some women have had damage to an ovary, have
    gone into early
    menopause, or had trouble getting pregnant after the
    procedure.

  • You don't want to have
    surgery
    (myomectomy or
    hysterectomy). You would need only
    local anesthesia for this procedure. And the doctor
    doesn't have to make any cuts in your skin. For most women, this means no
    hospital stay and a quicker return to normal activities, compared to
    surgery.3
  • You have other health problems, such as severe lung or liver disease, that make it
    risky for you to have surgery or use hormones.

How well does this procedure work to treat uterine fibroids?

Embolization
usually works well to treat fibroids. Short-term studies show
that:1

  • About 80 out of 100 women who had it said
    that their symptoms got better, while 20 out of 100 said
    their symptoms didn't get better.
  • It shrinks fibroids an average of about 50%.1

But the results don't always last: In one study, nearly 1 out of 4 women who had embolization needed another one or a
hysterectomy within the next couple of years.4

What are the risks of this procedure?

The chance
of a problem after
embolization is low. But the risks include:

  • Infection. This is the
    most serious possible problem. In rare cases, an emergency hysterectomy is
    needed to treat an infected uterus.
  • Early menopause.
  • Scar tissue (adhesions).
  • Pain that in rare cases could last for months.

Although some women can get pregnant after this
procedure, experts don't yet fully know the risks to pregnancy.

If you're thinking of having this procedure, look
for a
radiologist who has done it many times with few
problems.

Why might your doctor recommend fibroid embolization?

Your doctor might recommend this procedure if:

  • You've tried hormones, and they didn't work
    for you.
  • You have another health problem that makes surgery or
    hormones too risky.
  • You don't plan to get pregnant.

2. Compare your options

  Have embolization
Don't have this
procedure
What is usually involved?
  • You have
    local anesthesia so that you won't feel pain, and you
    get medicine to make you sleepy.
  • You will probably go home the same day, or you might spend the
    night in the hospital.
  • You probably can return to your usual
    activities in 7 to 10 days.
  • You could take
    over-the-counter pain medicine.
  • You could take hormones (GnRH-a) as a
    stand-alone treatment or before surgery to shrink fibroids. They're given as a
    shot or a nasal spray.
  • You could have surgery to take out your
    fibroids only (myomectomy) or your uterus (hysterectomy).
    (If you have a hysterectomy, you won't be able to get pregnant
    afterward.)
What are the benefits?
  • It may relieve your
    symptoms.
  • You probably would have a shorter recovery than you would
    with a
    hysterectomy.
  • Hysterectomy would
    cure your fibroids.
  • Myomectomy could control your symptoms and give you the best
    chance to get pregnant later.
  • Hormones could control your symptoms
    for a short time if you are near menopause, when fibroid problems usually go
    away.
What are the risks and side effects?
  • Possible but
    rare problems include:

    • Infection.
    • Early
      menopause.
    • Damage to the uterus or an
      ovary. This could make it harder to get pregnant.
    • Fibroids can grow back.
    • If your fibroids are large, embolization may not shrink the fibroid enough to make your symptoms go away.
    • Pain that could last for months. This is rare.
  • Surgery
    has risks, including bleeding and infection.
  • GnRH-a has side effects, such as:
    • Symptoms like those of menopause, such as
      hot flashes and vaginal dryness.
    • Possible bone loss if you take it
      for more than 6 months.
  • GnRH-a can be used only for a few months.
  • Fibroids can grow back after myomectomy or when you stop taking
    hormones.

Personal stories

Personal stories about uterine fibroid embolization

These stories are based on information gathered from health professionals and consumers. They may be helpful as you make important health decisions.

"I have had pain before and during my period for years. In the past year or so I started having really heavy bleeding, and my periods were lasting longer than usual. I tried nonprescription and prescription medicines to control the bleeding. Nothing was working. My doctor suggested a procedure called uterine fibroid embolization. I had the procedure, and my doctor was able to treat the fibroids. It didn't hurt too much, and I was surprised at how quickly I recovered. It has been 6 months now, and I no longer have those days of heavy bleeding. I am glad I had uterine fibroid embolization."

— Marlena, age 43

"Over the past 3 or 4 years, my periods have been getting heavier and heavier. My doctor did a bunch of tests and thought that uterine fibroids may be causing my symptoms. He suggested that I have a procedure called uterine fibroid embolization to control my bleeding. The procedure sounded scary, so I asked if waiting a few months would be dangerous. He said waiting would be fine. After a few months, my periods eased up. I am glad I decided to wait and see if my bleeding decreased before having the procedure."

— Angie, age
44

"About 3 years ago, my menstrual periods really changed for the worse. I began having cramps, and my periods were heavy with clotting and lasted for 2 weeks. I thought, "No way was that a totally normal period," and I made an appointment with my doctor. I tried a bunch of different medicines and nothing seemed to make much difference. After lots of further testing and discussion I had uterine fibroid embolization. I figure that since I don't want any more kids, any risk of losing my fertility is okay. The procedure was quick, and I was completely recovered in about 3 days. I had some pretty severe cramping afterwards, but it only lasted for about 12 hours and got better with ibuprofen. The embolization worked but I still have some odd cycles in that I bleed too many days per month, I get clotting some cycles, and some of my periods are heavier. My doctor says I may have to have another embolization, but I think it will be worth it."

— Raquel, age 32

"A couple of years ago I started having heavy, painful periods. My doctor said she thought I might have something I had never even heard of called uterine fibroids. Apparently they are pretty common as you get older. My doctor outlined all the different treatments I could try, including something called uterine fibroid embolization, if it ever got really bad. She said that I might consider starting with birth control pills and that I could try ibuprofen for a few days right before my period starts and then for several days during my period, to help control the bleeding. The embolization sounded pretty risky—I don't know if I could ever do that. Lucky for me, the birth control pills and ibuprofen have helped a lot. In fact, my doctor says that means the bleeding was more of a menstrual problem than a fibroid problem!"

— June, age 38

3. What matters most to you?

Your personal feelings are just as important as the medical facts. Think about what matters most to you in this decision, and show how you feel about the following statements.

Reasons to have uterine fibroid embolization

Reasons to choose another treatment

I don't want to have surgery or take hormones.

I would rather have surgery or take hormones.

             
More important
Equally important
More important

I don't plan to get pregnant.

I would like to be able to get pregnant after treatment.

             
More important
Equally important
More important

I want a shorter recovery.

I don't mind taking time to recover after surgery.

             
More important
Equally important
More important

I'm not close to menopause.

I'm close to menopause.

             
More important
Equally important
More important

I'm not worried about possible risks such as infection or pain.

I'm concerned about possible side effects from the procedure.

             
More important
Equally important
More important

My other important reasons:

My other important reasons:

   
             
More important
Equally important
More important

4. Where are you leaning now?

Now that you've thought about the facts and your feelings, you may have a general idea of where you stand on this decision. Show which way you are leaning right now.

Having embolization

NOT having embolization

             
Leaning toward
Undecided
Leaning toward

5. What else do you need to make your decision?

Check the facts

1.
Uterine fibroid embolization could be a good choice for me, because I don't plan to have more children.

  • True
  • False

  • I'm not sure

You're right. Embolization may be a good choice for women who don't want to get pregnant. There may be a higher-than-normal risk of pregnancy problems with this procedure.

2.
I can recover more quickly after embolization than after surgery.

  • True
  • False

  • I'm not sure

You're right. You can recover more quickly after embolization.

3.
Embolization will fix my fibroids for good.

  • True

  • False
  • I'm not sure

That's right. The procedure often gets rid of fibroids. But they may come back afterward.

Decide what's next

1.
Do you understand the options available to you?

2.
Are you clear about which benefits and side effects matter most to you?

3.
Do you have enough support and advice from others to make a choice?

Certainty

1.
How sure do you feel right now about your decision?

         
Not sure at all
Somewhat sure
Very sure

2.
Check what you need to do before you make this decision.

  • I'm ready to take action.
  • I want to discuss the options with others.
  • I want to learn more about my options.

 

Credits
By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer Sarah Marshall, MD - Family Medicine
Primary Medical Reviewer Kathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
Primary Medical Reviewer Martin J. Gabica, MD - Family Medicine
Primary Medical Reviewer Elizabeth T. Russo, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Divya Gupta, MD - Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gynecologic Oncology

References
Citations
  1. Practice Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Society of Reproductive Surgeons (2008). Myomas and reproductive function. Fertility and Sterility, 90(3): S125–S130.
  2. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (2008, reaffirmed 2012). Alternatives to hysterectomy in the management of leiomyomas. ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 96. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 112(2, Part 1): 387–399.
  3. Gupta JK, et al. (2012). Uterine artery embolization for symptomatic uterine fibroids. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (5).
  4. Lethaby A, Vollenhoven B (2015). Fibroids (uterine myomatosis, leiomyomas). BMJ Clinical Evidence. http://clinicalevidence.bmj.com/x/systematic-review/0814/overview.html. Accessed April 15, 2016.

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