G. Frederick Wooten Jr. MD


Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease happens when there is a problem with certain nerve cells in the brain that control movement. The classic symptoms are shaking (tremor), stiff muscles (rigidity), and slow movement (bradykinesia). It may also cause problems with balance or walking, as well as confusion and memory loss. Parkinson’s…

Parkinson’s Disease: Movement Problems From Levodopa

Movement problems (motor fluctuations) are the most common complication of long-term levodopa use. The majority of people who take levodopa develop these problems within 5 to 10 years. The main types of levodopa-related motor fluctuations include: The wearing-off effect. Wearing-off periods occur when the effects of a…

Thalamotomy

Thalamotomy (thalamic ablation) is a surgical procedure that destroys a small portion of the thalamus. The thalamus is a tiny area deep within the brain that sends and receives sensory information. Thalamotomy may benefit some people who have severe muscle tremors related to Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, or…

Parkinson-Plus Syndromes

Parkinson-plus syndromes are a group of neurological conditions that are similar to Parkinson’s disease but have unique characteristics. These syndromes can be hard to diagnose because the symptoms mimic other conditions. Following are the four most common types of Parkinson-plus syndromes. Progressive supranuclear…

Parkinson’s Disease: Movement Problems From Levodopa

Movement problems (motor fluctuations) are the most common complication of long-term levodopa use. The majority of people who take levodopa develop these problems within 5 to 10 years. The main types of levodopa-related motor fluctuations include: The wearing-off effect. Wearing-off periods occur when the effects of a…