G. Frederick Wooten Jr. MD


Parkinson’s Disease

What is Parkinson’s disease? Parkinson’s disease affects the way you move. It happens when there is a problem with certain nerve cells in the brain. Normally, these nerve cells make an important chemical called dopamine. Dopamine sends signals to the part of your brain that controls movement. It lets your muscles move…

Thalamotomy for Parkinson’s Disease

Thalamotomy is the precise destruction of a tiny area of the brain called the thalamus that controls some involuntary movements. Before surgery, detailed brain scans using a CT scan or MRI are done to identify the precise location for treatment. The person is awake during the surgery, but the scalp area where…

Dopamine

Dopamine is a brain chemical called a neurotransmitter that carries signals between nerve cells and helps the brain perform critical functions. Dopamine helps the brain control motor functions and movement and possibly to perform other functions related to mood. An imbalance or shortage of dopamine can cause brain…

Thalamotomy for Parkinson’s Disease

Thalamotomy is the precise destruction of a tiny area of the brain called the thalamus that controls some involuntary movements. Before surgery, detailed brain scans using a CT scan or MRI are done to identify the precise location for treatment. The person is awake during the surgery, but the scalp area where…

Parkinson-Plus Syndromes

Parkinson-plus syndromes are a group of neurological conditions that are similar to Parkinson’s disease but have unique characteristics. These syndromes can be hard to diagnose because the symptoms mimic other conditions. Following are the four most common types of Parkinson-plus syndromes. Progressive supranuclear…