Sarah Marshall MD


Breastfeeding: Using Medicines Safely

Prescription and nonprescription medications Talk to your doctor before you take any prescription or nonprescription medicine while breastfeeding. That’s because some medicines can affect your breast milk. But many medicines are safe to use when you breastfeed. These include certain pain relievers (such as acetaminophen…

Birth Control: Myths About Sex and Pregnancy

Several myths about when a woman can or cannot become pregnant persist, particularly among younger people. Myths and truths about becoming pregnant Myth Truth You can’t get pregnant the first time you have vaginal intercourse. Getting pregnant has nothing to do with how many times you have sex. If you are near the time…

Obesity and Pregnancy

How does your weight affect your pregnancy? Most pregnant women have healthy babies—and that includes women who are obese. But being very heavy does increase the chance of problems. Babies born to mothers who are obese have a higher risk of: Birth defects, such as a heart defect or neural tube defects. Being too large…

Pregnancy: Should I Have an Early Fetal Ultrasound?

Guides you through the decision to have an early fetal ultrasound. Explains when ultrasound is usually done during pregnancy and why. Lists risks and benefits. Includes interactive tool to help you decide.

Breastfeeding as Birth Control

Breastfeeding can be used as a method of birth control, called the lactational amenorrhea method (LAM). But three conditions must be met to ensure its effectiveness: Your baby must be 6 months of age or younger. After your baby is 6 months old, you are much more likely to become pregnant and need to use another method…